British Columbia

5 great Lower Mainland hikes from Vancouver Trails

The Grouse Grind officially opens today, but if you're not into sweating it out on 'Mother Nature's Stairmaster,' there are plenty of other hikes that are great alternatives at this time of year.

Vancouver Trails founder Michael Chang says there are hikes for all skill levels

Norvan Falls is a 14 kilometre hike in North Vancouver that rewards you with a spectacular view. (Vancouverrrails.com)

The Grouse Grind officially opens today, but if you're not into sweating it out on 'Mother Nature's Stairmaster' there are plenty of other hikes that are great alternatives at this time of year. 

On the Coast host Stephen Quinn spoke to Michael Chang, founder of Vancouver Trails, for his recommendations.

Norvan Falls  
Located in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park in North Vancouver, this hike can be done at practically any time of the year. The trek is about 14 kilometres without too much incline and takes about five hours.

Sendero Diez Vistas 
Sendero Diez Vistas offers 10 stunning views as you walk through the Buntzen Lake area. (Vancouvertrails.com)
Named Diez Vistas for its ten views, the hike takes you around the Buntzen Lake area offering viewpoints overlooking the Indian Arm. The area should be snow-free but expect some challenges with its hilly terrain. The 15 kilometre hike isn't for beginners, but it's not extremely difficult. 
Lighthouse Park 
Take the family for a stroll around Lighthouse Park (lighthousepark.ca)

If you're looking for something a little more family friendly, check out Lighthouse park in West Vancouver.  Take a stroll along the coast on one of its many trails and feel as though you've left the city behind you.
Lindeman Lake 
Leave the city and head to the Fraser Valley to check out Lindeman Lake. (Vancouvertrails.com)

If you want to get out of the city, try this hike located near Chilliwack Lake Provincial Park. It's only 3.4 kilometres but it's a nice stroll that's dog friendly and takes you across a log bridge built out of a fallen tree.

Dog Mountain 
It's relatively short hike at the top of Mount Seymour but offers spectacular views of Vancouver's Stanley Park, Lion Gate Bridge and downtown. There is minimal elevation but the path can be technical so be careful with your footing.

To listen to the full interview with Vancouver Trails' Michael Chang, listen to the audio labelled Lower Mainland hiking

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