British Columbia

2 lawyers to represent First Nations at missing women inquiry

Two lawyers have now been hired to replace the one who quit the missing women inquiry in frustration two weeks ago.

Two lawyers have now been hired to replace the one who quit the missing women inquiry in frustration two weeks ago.

Lawyers Suzette Narbonne and Elizabeth Hunt will represent First Nations interests at the inquiry looking into how serial killer Robert Pickton was allowed to hunt women for so long in Vancouver.

Robyn Gervais quit in protest saying the inquiry was focused too much on police and not enough on aboriginal women, who made up the majority of Pickton's victims.

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Commissioner Wally Oppal put the inquiry on hold for three weeks while a replacement for Gervais was sought, saying the voices of aboriginals needed to be heard during the inquiry.

Hunt, who's a member of the Kwakiutl First Nation on northern Vancouver Island, has experience with treaty negotiations, residential school claims and corporate and commercial law.

Narbonne started her career with Legal Aid Manitoba in the Pas, and now practises criminal law and human rights issues in Gibsons, B.C.