British Columbia

1,500 eligible voters in Boundary area didn't get voter information cards

Roughly 950 electors in Greenwood and 600 in Midway, B.C., did not get their voter information cards in the mail for this federal election. Those who didn't receive their voter information cards are still eligible to vote but will need to research which polling station they're supposed to go to.

Elections Canada says there was a mix up with mailing reprinted cards

A printing and mail snafu means over 1,550 people in the Boundary area did not receive their voter information cards. (Travis McEwan/CBC)

Elections Canada says roughly 950 electors in Greenwood and 600 in Midway, B.C. did not receive their voter information cards in the mail for this federal election.

"There was a problem in the printing and when it went to be reprinted we were promised that those cards would be sent out to the people at the beginning of this week. But we're hearing from residents that no one's received them yet," said Andrea Marantz, a spokesperson for Elections Canada.

Residents in the Boundary region of Interior B.C. who didn't receive their voter information cards are still eligible to vote but will need to research which polling station they're supposed to go to.

Elections Canada is asking anyone who didn't receive a voter information card to call the local Elections Canada office at 1-866-546-7622 to find out where they need to go to vote on Oct. 21. 

While some people may have voted at the same polling station in past federal elections, there is always a chance their assigned station has changed, Marantz told Radio West host Sarah Penton.

"It's very good to phone and be certain because there are boundaries to the different polling areas," she said.

"What we really don't want to happen is for people to go to a place assuming this is where they're going to vote and then have to go somewhere else."

She added they are "concerned" that people haven't received their cards, but she hopes those who didn't will call in and visit the Elections Canada website to learn what they need to do.

"We're always trying to make sure that it doesn't happen, but things like this do occasionally happen, and there are some areas [where] it's more difficult," said Marantz.

"A lot of rural areas across the country, we do have difficulty with the post office boxes not correlating to the location where the person lives and that can sometimes mix up the system."

What's needed to vote

You do not need a voter information card to cast a ballot. 

You can use a government issued piece of ID, such as a driver's licence, with your name, photo and current address on it or two pieces of other ID that both have your name on it and one that has your current address, or you can get someone to vouch for you, as long as they are able to prove their own identity and address.

If you are not registered to vote or if you didn't receive your voter information card, you can register at the polls.

With files from Radio West

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