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WikiLeaks makes Sony's hacked emails searchable

Whistleblower site WikiLeaks has published more than 30,000 documents and 170,000 emails from Sony Pictures from a hacking incident last December in a searchable online archive.

Studio's computer systems were trashed and emails leaked with embarrassing revelations

U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un were at odds last year over the Sony Pictures cyberattack. WikiLeaks is releasing thousands of Sony documents and emails. (The Associated Press)

Whistleblower site WikiLeaks has published more than 30,000 documents and 170,000 emails from Sony Pictures from a hacking incident last December in a searchable online archive.

The hack was attributed to North Korea, which was upset at the upcoming release of the comedy The Interview. It led to an international squabble in which the U.S. levied sanctions on North Korea.

Sony's computer systems were crippled by the December cyberattack and the release of its documents resulted in embarrassing revelations about inappropriate remarks by Sony head Amy Pascal as well as the behind-the-scenes negotiations over North Korea's threat to bomb theatres that showed The Interview.

Sony issued a statement today condemning WikiLeak's decision to release the documents in searchable form.

"The cyber-attack on Sony Pictures was a malicious criminal act, and we strongly condemn the indexing of stolen employee and other private and privileged information on WikiLeaks," a company spokesman said.

But Wikileaks founder Julian Assange said journalists didn't have a chance to fully investigate behind the scenes at Sony when the documents were first leaked.

"This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation," Assange said. "It is newsworthy and at the centre of a geo-political conflict. It belongs in the public domain. WikiLeaks will ensure it stays there."

That could mean more embarrassing revelations about Sony in the weeks ahead. For example, Wikileaks is touting leaks that show Sony's position on the Trans-Pacific Partnership – an upcoming trade deal – as well as details of its efforts to crack down on piracy.

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