Business

'No one should ever be mistreated this way,' apologetic United CEO says in TV interview

United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz said the company would not use law enforcement officers to remove overbooked passengers from aircraft in the wake of a video that showed a forcible removal of a Chicago passenger on Sunday.

'This can never, will never happen again,' Oscar Munoz says after passenger forcibly removed from plane

Left: United CEO Oscar Munoz. Right: Passenger David Dao, who was dragged off a United Airlines flight at Chicago O'Hare International Airport on April 9, 2017. (Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg, Jayse Anspach via Reuters)

After people were horrified by video of a passenger getting dragged off a full United Express flight by airport police, the head of United's parent company said the airline was reaching out to the man to "resolve this situation."

Hours later on Monday, his tone turned defensive. He described the man as "disruptive and belligerent."

By Tuesday afternoon, almost two days after the Sunday evening confrontation in Chicago, CEO Oscar Munoz issued his most contrite apology yet as details emerged about the man seen on cellphone videos recorded by other passengers at O'Hare Airport.

"No one should ever be mistreated this way," said Munoz, who also pledged to conduct a wide-ranging review of company policies.

On Wednesday morning, Munoz underlined his remorse in an interview with ABC's Good Morning America, saying he felt "ashamed" when he saw the videos.

"That is not who our family at United (Airlines) is," he said. "This will never happen again on a United flight. That's my promise."

The passenger was identified as physician David Dao, 69, of Elizabethtown, Kentucky.

A video screen capture shows passenger David Dao being dragged off a United Airlines flight at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. (Jayse D. Anspach via Reuters)

Screaming can be heard on the videos, but nowhere is Dao seen attacking the officers. In fact, he appears relatively passive both when he was dragged down the aisle of the jet and when he is seen standing in the aisle later saying quietly, "I want to go home, I want to go home."

Munoz's latest statement described the removal as "truly horrific." He said the company would reassess policies for seeking volunteers to give up their seats, for handling oversold situations and for partnering with airport authorities and local law enforcement.

An attorney who represents Dao said his client was being treated at a Chicago hospital for injuries he sustained on the plane and that the family would not comment.

Reuters reported Wednesday that lawyers for Dao filed an emergency request with an Illinois state court to require United to preserve video recordings and other evidence related to the incident, such as surveillance videos, cockpit voice recordings, and passenger and crew lists. The legal move is likely a step in advance of filing a lawsuit against the airline.

Officer placed on leave

Airport officials have said little about Sunday's events and nothing about Dao's behaviour before he was pulled from the jet that was bound for Louisville, Kentucky. Likewise, the Chicago Aviation Department has said only that one of its employees who removed Dao did not follow proper procedures and has been placed on leave.

No passengers on the plane have mentioned that Dao did anything but refuse to leave the plane when he was ordered to do so.

Also Tuesday, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel called the way Dao was treated "completely unacceptable" and praised Aviation Commissioner Ginger Evans for taking "swift action." He promised that a city investigation would "ensure nothing like this ever happens again."

The event stemmed from a common air travel issue — a full flight. United was trying to make room for four employees of a partner airline, meaning four people had to get off.

At first, the airline asked for volunteers, offering $400 and then when that did not work, $800 per passenger to relinquish a seat. When no one voluntarily came forward, United selected four passengers at random.

Three people got off the flight, but the fourth said he was a doctor and needed to get home to treat patients on Monday. He refused to leave.

Three Aviation Department police officers got on the plane. Two officers tried to reason with the man before a third came aboard and pointed at the man "basically saying, 'Sir, you have to get off the plane,'" said Tyler Bridges, a passenger whose wife, Audra D. Bridges, posted a video on Facebook. 

One of the officers could be seen grabbing the screaming man from his window seat, across the armrest and dragging him down the aisle by his arms. 

Other passengers on Flight 3411 are heard saying, "Please, my God," ''What are you doing?" ''This is wrong," ''Look at what you did to him" and "Busted his lip."

According to a report Wednesday from Bloomberg, United Continental Holdings Inc. indicated it will compensate all passengers for the cost of the flight in which the man was removed. A spokesperson did not say if the compensation will come as cash, frequent fliers points, or some other form.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced Tuesday that it is reviewing Sunday's events to see if United violated rules on overselling flights.

Dao's relatives are focused only on his medical care, attorney Stephen L. Golan said. The family "wants the world to know that they are very appreciative of the outpouring of prayers, concern and support they have received."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.