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The case of the stolen PC Optimum points: CBC's Marketplace consumer cheat sheet

Miss something this week? Don't panic. CBC's Marketplace rounds up the consumer and health news you need.

Plus: Pumping the brakes on self-driving cars and overcharging for hospital phones

You might want to check your PC Optimum rewards balance in the wake of a recent heist. (CBC)

Miss something this week? Don't panic. CBC's Marketplace rounds up the consumer and health news you need.

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Thieves steal millions of PC Optimum points

If you have a PC Optimum account, you might want to check your rewards balance. People across Canada say their points were stolen and spent. One woman lost more than one million points (worth more than $1,000) when someone hacked her account and went on a shopping spree. Loblaws didn't explain how the heist happened, but said members should create strong, unique passwords.

More Canadians are storing their stuff

Canadians need more room to store their stuff. Industry statistics show that on average, Canadians have two square feet of storage per person (versus nine in the U.S.). Companies are investing big bucks to improve the look (and smell) of storage lockers and are offering new services like pickup and delivery at the click of a mouse.

Industry statistics show that on average, Canadians have two square feet of storage per person. (CBC News)

Toyota has stopped testing self-driving cars

Toyota is putting the brakes on autonomous vehicle testing after an Uber self-driving vehicle struck and killed a woman in Arizona. They worry the incident may have an emotional effect on their test drivers. Experts say the accident could mean we won't see self-driving cars on the streets for a while. They warn that the "state of autonomous driving is very far from where it needs to be."

Toyota said it was pausing automated driving tests in the wake of a pedestrian fatality in Tempe, Ariz., involving an Uber self-driving SUV. (Koji Sasahara/Associated Press)

Senior overcharged for hospital phone

A Halifax senior was charged for a hospital telephone bill that spanned almost three years, even though she only spent 39 days in hospital. Her family discovered she had been paying an additional monthly charge when reviewing her bills. Bell Aliant said patients are required to cancel their hospital phone service and that they're not notified when patients are discharged for privacy reasons.

Patricia Archer's family tried to get Bell to remove a $2,200 bedside phone bill from her account, charged over the course of three years despite her 39-day stay in hospital. (Submitted by Jerry Archer)

What else is going on?

Consumer trust in grocery stores has fallen. A new study shows Loblaws trustworthiness has taken a hit since allegations emerged that many of the chains were in cahoots to keep bread prices high.

No more 'phantom vehicles.' Transport Canada is introducing new rules to stop cars from operating without lights in the dark. The manufacturing standards kick in for all new cars beginning September 2021.

Aeroplan has struck a deal with Amazon. Starting in April, Aeroplan members who visit Amazon.ca through Aeroplan's web portal will be able to earn miles for every dollar spent.

This week in recalls

This multiple sclerosis drug could cause brain disorders; this ground beef could be contaminated with E. coli; these pacifier and teether holders could be a choking hazard; this riding lawnmower could unintentionally mow when it's driven in reverse; this power bank's battery could overheat and ignite fire; these smoke detectors have sensors that could fail to detect smoke.

We're on a break this week

We'll be back with a new show April 6, but while we're away, you can binge watch our past episodes on YouTube.