Business

IHOP's changing its name to IHOb, and it's causing an uproar online

It's been known as IHOP — the International House of Pancakes — for over 60 years, but now the famous U.S. restaurant chain is changing its name, and it's causing an uproar online.

The company posted a tweet saying it is flipping the 'P' in its name to a 'b'

IHOP posted a tweet on Monday saying it is flipping the 'P' in its name to a 'b' with a six-second video displaying the flip in its logo, adding, 'Find out what it could be' on June 11.

Could it be "bees," "butter" or even "books"? Or is it just plain old "breakfast"?

It's been known as IHOP — the International House of Pancakes — for over 60 years, but now the famous U.S. restaurant chain is changing its name, and it's causing an uproar online.

The company posted a tweet on Monday saying it is "flippin'" the "P" in its name to a "b" with a six-second video displaying the flip in its logo, adding, "Find out what it could b" on June 11.

Since then, almost 1.9 million people have viewed the video in the post, while more than 11,000 Twitter users were talking about the tweet with the hashtag #IHOb.

As a debate raged online about what the "b" could stand for, IHOP tweeted some options in a poll, ranging from "Bacon" to "Barnacles." More than 28,000 users had voted in the poll as of Wednesday morning.

  

Added to that, the company's website greeted visitors with a big countdown that shows the days to the seconds until IHOP reveals what the "b" in its new name stands for next week.

What could it 'b'?

Meanwhile, the response on social media to IHOP changing its widely recognized name has ranged from humour to anger and everything in between.

The guesses on what the "b" could stand for ranged from obvious food names to comical and bizarre suggestions as such "bankruptcy."

Added to that, users seemed even more confused as to why IHOP would consider changing its name in the first place.

We'll all have our answer on Monday.

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