Business

Bombardier, Airbus end talks over CSeries jet investment

Airbus on Tuesday called off talks with Bombardier over propping up the troubled CSeries jet, leaving the Canadian plane-maker facing dwindling options to keep its dream of competing in the aerospace big league alive.

Quebec-based aerospace company says it will explore 'potential participation in industry consolidation'

On Tuesday, Airbus and Bombardier ended talks over propping up the troubled CSeries jet. (Christinne Muschi/Reuters)

Airbus on Tuesday called off talks with Bombardier over propping up the troubled CSeries jet, leaving the Canadian plane-maker facing dwindling options to keep its dream of competing in the aerospace big league alive.

The latest blow to Bombardier, which has been trying to shore up its shrinking cash reserves for months, came after Reuters reported that Bombardier had made an offer to Airbus.

Both companies acknowledged that talks had taken place. A source familiar with the situation said Airbus ended the talks shortly after they became public.

Under the proposed deal, Airbus would have helped Bombardier complete development of the troubled aircraft in exchange for a controlling stake in the program, effectively ending Bombardier's independent efforts to break into the lower end of the global airplane market dominated by Airbus and Boeing .

Bombardier shares jumped 13 per cent on the Toronto Stock Exchange immediately after Reuters reported the approach, ending the day up 15 per cent at $1.77. The shares are still worth less than a quarter of their value in July 2008, when Bombardier officially launched the CSeries jet.

After the report, Airbus confirmed that it had been exploring business opportunities with Bombardier but that such discussions were no longer being pursued.

Bombardier then confirmed it had held talks with Airbus about "certain business opportunities," but those discussions were no longer underway. The company said it would continue to "explore initiatives, such as a potential participation in industry consolidation," but gave no further details.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now