Business

Only 8% of consumers sharing their data say it's worth it, Aimia survey indicates

A new report suggests 89 per cent of Canadians have signed up for loyalty programs, but few appear happy with the deals they are offered in exchange for sharing their personal information.

Aeroplan owner polled 20,000 people globally for opinions on sharing data

Few Canadians think it is worth the effort and cost involved in terms of giving up personal data to get deals and targeted offers from brands, a new survey by the owner of Aeroplan suggests. (iStock)

A survey of 20,000 people in 11 countries done by Aimia Inc. suggests a minority of them were satisfied with the rewards they get in exchange for sharing personal information with businesses.

The Montreal-based company said 31 per cent of the Canadian respondents rated their personal information as "highly valuable" and 26 per cent said that they expect better service and benefits in return for sharing it.

Only eight per cent of the Canadian respondents felt they get better offers as a result of sharing the information.

Aimia executive David Johnson says companies have an opportunity to build meaningful relationships with their customers but the "golden moment" will quickly disappear if they fail to respond appropriately.

The company has employees in 20 countries including Canada and provides its clients with analytics of consumer data.

The 11-country global survey compiled responses from Australia, Brazil, Canada, several members of the European Union, India, the United Arab Emirates and the United States.

Corrections

  • A previous headline to this story suggested the Aimia research dealt solely with loyalty programs. In fact, the survey of more than 20,000 consumers focused on their willingness to share personal information with brands.
    Sep 08, 2015 10:47 AM ET

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