Entertainment·Video

The Art of the Steal inspired by '50s-era heist films

Heavier-themed films dominated the discussion at the Toronto International Film Festival, but the lineup also featured lighter fare like local filmmaker Jonathan Sobol's throwback heist flick The Art of the Steal.

Kurt Russell, Matt Dillon and Jay Baruchel star in Toronto director Jonathan Sobol's latest

Director Jonathan Sobol and actor Jay Baruchel on their heist film 8:17

Heavier-themed films dominated the discussion at the Toronto International Film Festival, but the lineup also featured lighter fare like local filmmaker Jonathan Sobol's throwback heist flick The Art of the Steal.

A star-studded outing that includes Kurt Russell, Matt Dillon and Terence Stamp along with Canadians Jay Baruchel, Jason Jones and Katheryn Winnick, the film is a bit of a throwback, says Toronto-based director Sobol, who was inspired by heist movies of the 1950s.

"I like the blue collar guys doing tactile things. In the past 20 years, when you see a heist film, it’s like some computer programmer will hack into the mainframe," he told CBC News on Wednesday ahead of the film's evening gala premiere.

"I kind of like the nuts and bolts thing."

Russell stars as a fading stunt motorcycle driver and former master thief who is trying to escape his past when he is lured into a fresh caper involving his brother (played by Dillon). Baruchel appears as Russell's fast-talking sidekick.

In the attached video, Sobol and Baruchel (a rising producer and screenwriter as well as actor) talk to Eli Glasner about tweaking conventions of the heist film genre, what films inspired The Art of the Steal and working with cinematic heroes like Russell.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.