Entertainment

Russell Crowe scolds Virgin for hoverboard ban on flight

Actor Russell Crowe may be an Academy Award-winning performer but that doesn't mean he'll be allowed to roll into a commercial airliner with a hoverboard.

Hoverboards are banned from luggage and hand baggage on many airlines due to safety concerns

Russell Crowe arrives at the Los Angeles premiere of The Water Diviner at TCL Chinese Theatre, on April 16, 2015. (Rich Fury/Invision/AP)

Actor Russell Crowe may be an Academy Award-winning performer but that doesn't mean he'll be allowed to roll into a commercial airliner with a hoverboard.

Crowe tweeted angrily on Tuesday night at Virgin Australia's Twitter account, writing: 

The airline replied publicly, stating that hoverboards have always been banned from flights as luggage.

"Hi Russell, due to safety concerns over the lithium ion batteries in hoverboards, these have been banned on all major Australian airlines and many around the world. We're sorry you were not aware of this prior to check-in today. We hope to see you on board again soon."

Crowe evidently wasn't satisfied with the explanation.

The airline replied again, noting that hoverboards are banned from the airline's list of dangerous goods.

Virgin Atlantic does list "hoverboards, swagway boards, mini segway, self-balancing boards, smart balance, wheels and breeze boards" as banned from all luggage and hand baggage, though they may be carried as cargo.

Afterwards, Crowe replied to Australian actor and comedian Joel Creasey, who wrote: "You're a millionaire, babe. Get some perspective."

Hoverboards, also known as self-balancing scooters, don't actually hover above the ground, but roll on two wheels and require the rider to balance the board's two halves to manoeuvre. Safety concerns have arisen after some of the batteries and charging equipment have caused fires.

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