Entertainment

How to watch Tragically Hip's Man Machine Poem tour finale

The countdown is on. Tragically Hip fans across Canada are prepping for the Man Machine Poem tour finale in the band's hometown of Kingston, Ont., on Saturday.

Viewing parties are being held across Canada as well as in Rio, London, Los Angeles, Mexico

On Saturday, the Tragically Hip will wrap up a 15-date jaunt across Canada with a show in the band's hometown of Kingston, Ont. You can tune into the concert via CBC, which is broadcasting and streaming the show live and commercial free. (Mike Horner)

The countdown is on. Tragically Hip fans across Canada are prepping for the Man Machine Poem tour finale in the band's hometown of Kingston, Ont., on Saturday.

Emotions of Hip devotees have been high since the iconic band revealed that frontman Gord Downie had been diagnosed with an aggressive, incurable form of brain cancer.

With Kingston's Rogers K-Rock Centre able to hold fewer than 6,000 people, most Hip fans plan to tune into the concert via CBC, which is broadcasting and streaming the show live and commercial free: online, and on television and radio. 

As of 5 p.m. ET on Friday, 436 community viewing parties were scheduled. Parties were planned from Yukon's Marsh Lake Community Centre, to Victoria Park in Charlottetown — as well as internationally, with approved as well as fan-organized screenings in New York, London, Los Angeles and Mexico, and in Rio de Janeiro as the Brazilian city prepares to wrap up the Summer Olympics. 


The Tragically Hip concert begins at 8:30 p.m. ET Saturday and will be broadcast nationally and streamed around the globe, in its entirety.

There will be no on-demand, nor online streaming playback, of the full event following the live show.


Watch or listen online (worldwide):

Watch (nationally):

  • CBC Television

Listen (nationally):

  • CBC Radio One
  • CBC Radio 2
  • CBC Radio One on Sirius XM Channel 169
Though the Hip has refrained from calling this tour its last, fans have nonetheless turned out in droves to celebrate the beloved Canadian rockers. (Mike Horner)

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