Entertainment

Brad Pitt OK with son, 13, seeing brutal war film Fury

Brad Pitt says he's comfortable with son, Maddox, seeing his new movie, Fury, that depicts the brutality of Second World War combat.

"We talk about it afterward" says actor on letting Maddox see violent movies

Brad Pitt stars as Sergeant Don 'Wardaddy' Collins in Fury. The actor says he's "comfortable" letting his 13-year-old son, Maddox, see the movie despite its grisly depiction of war battle because he can handle the content. (Giles Keyte/Sony Pictures Entertainment/Associated Press)

While the World War II drama Fury depicts a gruesome look at war through the exploits of a tank crew in Nazi Germany, Brad Pitt feels his 13-year old son, Maddox, can handle the content.

"He's a World War II buff," Pitt told The Associated Press on Wednesday night on the red carpet for the film's world premiere.

The world is a beautiful place, but it's also a very violent place. We talk about it afterward, so I'm not so opposed- Actor Brad Pitt on letting his son watch violent movies

Some have criticized the film's stark brutality. Scenes of a soldier's body getting torn up during rapid machine-gun fire or a tank commander decapitated has the made the film a little too real.

The newly married father of six contends that when it comes to what's appropriate for his children, he comes from "another generation."

"My father would take us to the drive-in as very young kids and we'd see Clint Eastwood movies and kung fu movies," the 50-year old actor said.

He added: "The world is a beautiful place, but it's also a very violent place. We talk about it afterward, so I'm not so opposed."

On the subject of family, Pitt was amused at the notion that he and George Clooney had a pact that they would both get married. Pitt married longtime love Angelina Jolie earlier this year, and Clooney tied the knot in September.

Pitt laughed at the theory before responding: "We did it for the right reasons."

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