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Up North

Connecting and reflecting Northern Ontario with a mix of stories and music. Up North weekdays from 4:00 to 6:00 PM ET.

  • 07:09
    Some six years after a deadly mall collapse made national headlines, the roof of another public building in Elliot Lake partially caved in Thursday night. It happened at the Lester B. Pearson Civic Centre, and this time nobody was seriously hurt The roof collapsed over the auditorium where Murray Finn was getting ready to rehearse the play he's directing.
    Feb 22, 2019
  • 04:38
    When we think about human trafficking some of us still think about movies like "Taken," where a group of foreign kidnappers makes off with a couple of tourists. Those kinds of ideas about what trafficking actually looks like might be part of the reason we haven't managed to stop it. Last year in Thunder Bay, a coalition of community services came together to try and change that. Today is National Human Trafficking Awareness Day, and they're using the opportunity to get the word about about what you can do to help. The CBC's Heather Kitching spoke with the coalition's co-chair, Kris Carlson.
    Feb 22, 2019
  • 06:52
    Over a month ago, the remote community of Cat Lake First Nation declared a state of emergency. In it, leaders decried dangerously inadequate housing -- including rampant mould -- and linked it to a slew of chronic medical problems. Earlier this week, a 48-year-old woman from the community died in hospital in Thunder Bay. The cause of her death is still unknown, pending an autopsy, but her family believes exposure to that mould was a contributing factor. On Parliament Hill and at Queens Park, opposition members have called for action. Today, some was promised. The federal government and regional Indigenous leaders signed an interim framework agreement in Thunder Bay this afternoon. It pledges over 10 million dollars to repair and rebuild dozens of homes in Cat Lake. Indigenous Services Minister Seamus O'Regan and Cat Lake Chief Matthew Keewaykapow were among the signatories.
    Feb 21, 2019
  • 07:25
    Imagine being young, becoming passionate about a trade, and then competing on the world stage. Elina Seguin flew to India with her teacher to try to become the greatest Culinary Olympiad on planet earth. That's right, cooking your way into stardom. She and her now retired culinary arts teacher chef Daniel Esposito, recently returned from competing. Here they are speaking with Up North host Waubgeshig Rice.
    Feb 21, 2019
  • 06:29
    On Manitoulin Island, deer are having a hard time getting to food sources and some are even dying. So the organization Manitoulin Streams is urging residents to help deer by clearing paths through the snow for them, among other measures. It's launched an initiative called Deer Save. It wants to maintain a healthy deer population on the island in order to keep tourists and hunters visiting. Bob Florean is a board member with Manitoulin Streams. He spoke with Up North host Waubgesig Rice. I reached him by phone earlier to ask about the program.
    Feb 21, 2019
  • 06:58
    The Road To Tophet is about a young man who runs drugs across the border on his snowmobile. Steve Schmidt is the writer and director. He spoke recently with Up North host Waubgeshig Rice.
    Feb 21, 2019
  • 05:46
    Queen's Park resumed this week and from the get-go it has been heated. One hot topic has been the changes announced earlier this month to the Ontario Autism Program. Dozens of parents who have children with autism made the trip to Queen's Park today. Under the new program that takes effect April 1, families with autistic children under the age of six will receive up to $20,000 a year with a lifetime max of 140,000. Children over the age of six will be eligible for $5,000 until they turn 18 to a max of 55 thousand. Many parents have been on wait lists for years and feel that the new funding will not cover the true expense for therapy. We begin with NDP MPP for Timmins, Gilles Bisson, with his question.
    Feb 20, 2019
  • 04:36
    Just when many towns and cities are struggling with towering snowbanks and impassable sidewalks, there's even more snow coming to parts of northern Ontario. All that snow and ice is taking a toll on snow removal machinery and budgets in some communities. Larry Girardi is with Sault Ste. Marie's public works and engineering department. Up North Host I called him earlier today to see how his city is coping with all this snow.
    Feb 20, 2019
  • 06:29
    It's been over two years since the months-long inquest into the deaths of seven First Nations students wrapped up in Thunder Bay. The young people died in the northwestern Ontario city between 2000 and 2011 while attending school. The inquest into their deaths concluded with jurors making 145 recommendations aimed at preventing similar tragedies. Those calls to action were made to many parties, including the federal and provincial governments, the city of Thunder Bay, as well as Indigenous leaders and education providers. Aboriginal Legal Services has committed to issuing yearly progress reports in order to publicize the work being done. Jonathan Rudin, the program director for Aboriginal Legal services says that's positive. Here he is speaking to reporters in Thunder Bay.
    Feb 20, 2019
  • 04:21
    Thunder Bay police will keep testing out body-worn cameras for another six weeks. The police services board in the city received an update on the pilot project Tuesday. The project is being extended so that the force can make use of some new equipment that just arrived. But wearing a body camera is already having an impact on how Constable Mike Dimini does his job. Dimini is a member of the Traffic Unit, and a director with the Thunder Bay Police Association. He was the very first officer to start using the camera. The CBC's Cathy Alex asked him what he thinks of it.
    Feb 19, 2019
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