Life Video·Video

This sustainable 'rammed earth' home is a sparkling example of earth-friendly living

Tour this self sufficient hideaway with with amethyst, turquoise and ammonites built right into its walls.

Tour this self sufficient hideaway with with amethyst, turquoise and ammonites built right into its walls

Tour this self-sufficient hideaway with with amethyst, turquoise and ammonites built right into its walls. 3:30

Wes and Julia were looking to build a sustainable, environmentally friendly home on a rural, wooded plot of land in Cramahe, Ontario. After touring a few homes and seeing different building methods first hand, they confidently decided on the rammed earth technique.

Rammed earth is a building system where walls are created out of compacted subsoil. The construction process essentially does what mother nature does over a millennia; turns earth into solid rock. Rammed earth is not a new technology; the technique was often used in areas without trees or other materials used to build structures. Though rammed earth walls may be time consuming to build, they are strong, fire resistant and energy efficient. Numerous examples of the rammed earth technique exist all over the world, including parts of the Great Wall of China.

To find out more about Rammed Earth building visit aerecura.ca.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.