Video

This animal sanctuary is a lifeline for injured and orphaned wildlife

A baby skunk without a Mom, an owl struck by a car, a bunny with a broken neck —- every day brings a new challenge at Shades of Hope.

Every day brings a new challenge at Shades of Hope

A baby skunk without a Mom, an owl struck by a car, a bunny with a broken neck —- every day brings a new challenge at Shades of Hope 4:03

After witnessing the rural farming community she grew up in turn into a city and seeing many displaced wild animals in need of help, Gail Lenters became increasingly concerned about the future of wildlife and founded Shades of Hope. The sanctuary offers injured, sick and orphaned wildlife veterinary care, proper nourishment and a safe place to flourish until they're healthy enough to resume their place in nature. Since opening its doors in 2013, Shades of Hope has treated more than 15,000 wild animals, and treats 30 to 40 animals a day during the spring and summer months.

How you can help right now

Fall is migration season and as birds fly south, some get confused by artificial light and glass buildings. If you find a flightless bird that's hit a window, place it in a small box lined with a non-fraying towel and air holes poked from the inside out (in order to allow the maximum amount of air in). Place the box in a warm, quiet and dark area with no food or water in it.

After a couple of hours have passed, put the box outside and take the lid off. Often, the bird will fly away immediately. However, if it doesn't attempt to fly, or can't fly far, it should be transported to Shades of Hope or a local wildlife rescue right away. If the bird hit the window with enough force, it may have fractured bones, head trauma or internal bleeding and need professional treatment.

For more information on how you can help or donate visit: www.shadesofhope.ca

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.