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Step inside this restored 1920s mansion first owned by infamous rum-runner Harry Low

Once frequented by Al Capone, this Ontario home is as full of stories as it is ornate detailing.

Once frequented by Al Capone, this Ontario home is as full of stories as it is ornate detailing

For almost 20 years, Vern Myslichuk kept his eye on this imposing 1928 mansion, a structure so unusual on the outside that it defies any particular style. Myslichuk knew one day he would come to own the Windsor, Ont. home, and in 2014, he was finally able to make that dream a reality. 

Now known as Low-Martin Lodge, the architectural fixture was originally built for Harry Low, a rum-runner with ties to Al Capone, who made his fortune during the Prohibition. In the 1960s, the house passed hands to another famous Canadian, politician Paul Martin Sr., whose son later became our PM in 2003, and who is said to have hosted many a Prime Minister during his time there

When Myslichuk took ownership of the home, he made sure to retain its more unique elements, such as the Cotswold-style roof, turrets, archways and many rounded rooms. He also restored the custom moulding, woodwork and ornate ceiling details that cover the home's interior, leaving it feeling even more castlelike than before. Check out the video below to take a full tour of this eclectic abode and learn more about its history. 

Step inside this restored 1920s mansion first owned by infamous rum-runner Harry Low

2 years ago
Duration 2:43
Once frequented by Al Capone, this Ontario home is as full of stories as it is ornate detailing.

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