PROFILE — The pandemic isn’t slowing down this teen violinist’s big dreams

CBC Kids News • Published 2020-07-23 17:00

13-year-old heading to Carnegie Hall next year


We're profiling cool kids doing cool things.
Know someone you think should be profiled on our site?
Email us at cbckidsnews@cbc.ca and tell us what makes them so awesome.


Name

Lincoln Haggart-Ives

Hometown

Vaughan, Ont.

Age

13

Lincoln Haggart-Ives has received private lessons from a number of prestigious musicians during the pandemic as he prepares to play Carnegie Hall in 2021.  (Photo submitted by Maria Haggart)

Claim to fame

Last month, violinist Lincoln Haggart-Ives was supposed to do something many musicians only ever dream of.

He was supposed to play Carnegie Hall, one of the most renowned theatres in the world.

Back in February, Lincoln was one of a select few musicians invited to play at the famous New York City music venue after winning the American Protégé Music Competition.

 “I think it’s important to have diverse representation in classical music. I feel like I can bring this music to a wider audience and inspire young people to get involved.” - Lincoln Haggart-Ives

The competition is designed to spotlight young, aspiring talents.

According to the organizers, this year was the most competitive to date and included applications from more than 50 countries.

When Lincoln found out his Carnegie performance would be delayed for a year due to the pandemic, he chose to focus on the bright sides.

Lincoln will be performing Csárdás by Italian composer Vittorio Monti at Carnegie Hall next year. (Image credit: Natalie Nanowski/CBC)

“Now I have more time to prepare the piece that I’m going to be playing,” Lincoln told CBC Kids News.

And that’s exactly what he’s doing.

Along with practising for Carnegie, Lincoln has been up to a lot of cool things during the pandemic.

Last month, he and the Mooredale Senior Orchestra put together a virtual concert for their final performance of the year, recording all of their individual parts from home.

For their virtual concert, Lincoln and the Mooredale Senior Orchestra played Beethoven's 5th Symphony and Mozart's Overture to The Magic Flute. (Image credit: Mooredale Concerts)

Along with that, Lincoln had a private Skype session with Alexandr Shelley, the music director of the National Arts Centre Orchestra (NACO) in Ottawa.

He also had a private lesson with Elaine Klimasko, one of the founding members of the NACO, and is set to have lessons with Yosuke Kawasaki, concertmaster of the NACO.

Striking a chord

Lincoln said that, as a Black person, he hopes that his participation in the world of classical music, which lacks diversity, will inspire and invite others in.

“I think it’s important to have diverse representation in classical music. I feel like I can bring this music to a wider audience and inspire young people to get involved.”

Lincoln said he plays music because it calms him, and it ‘makes him feel like he’s in his own world’ with nothing to worry about. (Image credit: Maria Haggart)

Lincoln said he is constantly inspired by Sheku Kanneh-Mason — a famous Black cellist — and wants to “inspire young people in the same way he does.”

As for his career, Lincoln is setting his sights high.

“I would like to join a world-renowned orchestra and work with talented musicians. I also might want to be a soloist one day.”


With files from Desmond Brown/CBC
TOP IMAGE CREDIT: (Submitted by Maria Haggart)

Get your class on the same page, add this to
Google Classroom

Do you like this story?