WATCH — How to make a 3-layer mask

Story by CBC Kids News • 2020-11-06 14:08

Canada’s top doctor says 3 is better than 2

If you’ve been collecting face masks to match your outfits, there’s something new to consider now: your mask should have three layers.

That’s the recommendation from Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer.

Earlier this week, she announced that based on the most up-to-date research, three layers offer better protection against the spread of the coronavirus than two.

So what should you do with all your other masks?

Before you throw them out, check and see if they can be modified based on the new recommendations.

Here’s how to modify your mask

Two layers of the mask should be made of a tightly woven fabric, such as cotton or linen.

The middle layer should be a filter-type fabric, such as non-woven polypropylene fabric, which is what is often used to make reusable grocery bags.

It’s also used as an arts and craft material.

Don’t have non-woven polypropylene fabric? Health Canada says you can use a folded paper towel.

A black reusable grocery bag and a paper towel.

A piece of a reusable shopping bag like this one or paper towels can be used as a filter to create a third layer in a mask. (Image credit: Sabrina Fabian/CBC)

Some masks have pockets so you can slide in a paper towel or a filter.

You can also make your own mask with fabric, elastics and paper towel.

Watch this DIY video from CBC Kids News contributor Isabel DeRoy-Olson:

More tips from Health Canada

Filters add an extra layer of protection against COVID-19 by trapping small infectious particles.

If you use non-woven polypropylene fabric, you should wash it every day.

If you use a paper towel, throw it out and use a new one every day.

Filters should not interfere with your breathing.

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, has been advising Canadians to prevent the spread of COVID-19. (Image credit: CBC)

Looking for more tips about COVID-19? Check out these articles and videos:


TOP IMAGE CREDIT: Philip Street/CBC

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