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Awesome athletes you may not know were adopted

 

(Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

There are many reasons why someone is adopted or legally raised by someone who is not their birth parent. Check out some great athletes who you may not have known were adopted.

Simone Biles

Simone Biles competes on the beam

(Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

Simone and her three siblings were born in Columbus, Ohio. Their biological parents were unable to care for their children, so Simone’s grandfather and his second wife adopted Simone and one of her siblings, and his sister adopted the other two. Her adoptive parents introduced her to gymnastics at the age of six.

trophySimone has won 20 Olympic and World Championship medals combined — more than any other gymnast in her country’s history! Many consider her the greatest gymnast of all time.
 

Michael Oher

Michael Orr playing as 74 for Mississippi out on the field

Michael Oher plays left tackle for Mississippi in 2006. (AP Photo/Rogelio C. Solis, File)

Michael’s childhood was filled with challenges — he went to 11 different schools between kindergarten and grade 9. His mother had 12 children, and his father was in and out of prison. He lived in different foster homes, and at times, he was even homeless. Michael was eventually adopted by a kind couple whose children attended the same school that he did.

trophyMichael became a star player at the University of Mississippi. He was a first-round pick in the NFL’s 2009 draft and has played for three pro football teams. His life story was made into a movie called The Blind Side.

Aaron Judge

Aaron Judge of the New York Yankees looking up after hitting a baseball

Aaron Judge, #99 of the New York Yankees. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

Aaron was adopted very early in his life — the day after he was born! His adoption is known as a closed adoption. This means that he has never met or contacted his birth parents. Aaron has expressed no interest in meeting his biological parents and views his adoptive parents as his only parents. He also credits them with teaching him the value of hard work and respect. 

trophyAaron had one of the most amazing rookie seasons in baseball history! He hit a major league rookie record of 52 home runs, was named an all-star and the American League Rookie of the Year in 2017.

Peter and Kitty Carruthers

Peter lift Kitty Carruthers as they perform on the ice during Tribute to American Legends of the Ice

Kitty and Peter Carruthers skate together during "Tribute to American Legends of the Ice" in 2013. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Peter and Kitty Carruthers are not biological siblings (they come from different parents). They were both adopted by the Carruthers family. Peter’s birth family is Dutch and English, while Kitty’s is from Lebanon. They started skating on a local pond when Kitty was 6 and Peter was 8. Their adoptive parents became their biggest supporters, even creating a backyard rink, complete with lighting for nighttime skating and stereo speakers for them to practice on.

trophyPeter and Kitty Carruthers earned first place at four U.S. Championships, a silver medal and the 1984 Winter Olympics and a bronze medal at the World Figure Skating Championships. They were inducted into the United States Figure Skating Hall of Fame in 1999.