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6 of the world’s strangest museums

 

Photo by snackariah licensed CC BY-SA 2.0


Museum building illustrationMuseum building illustration.When you think of a museum, you probably think of grand buildings with old artifacts like helmets, pottery and statues. But museum collections can come in all shapes and sizes.


From collections of noodles to toilets, check out our list of some of the strangest museums around the world!

Cupnoodles Museum – Japan

Showcasing all the varieties of noodles from wall to ceiling
Photo by Cyradis licensed CC BY-NC-ND

If you love ramen, this is the place to be. This museum tells you all you need to know about our favourite noodle snack and its creator, Momofuku Ando. You’ll learn how Ando created the world’s first instant ramen after a year of experimenting, and see the tools and ingredients he used.

You can also play interactive games or roll up your sleeves and make some fresh noodles. You can even design your very own cup of noodles packaging to take away as a souvenir.


Dog Collar Museum – England

Four gold or brass-looking dog collars.
Photo via Leeds Castle

If you’re ever in England, head on down to Leeds Castle in Kent for a real one-of-a-kind museum. The former stables is where you’ll find the world’s only museum for dog collars.

From super old dog collars with scary sharp spikes to fancy dog collars made from precious metals, there are more than 130 unique designs to see. Historians have used these dog collars to find out how people in the past felt about our furry friends.


Museu Subacuqatico de Arte – Mexico

A snorkeler underwater checking out a sculpture at the Museu Subacuqatico de Arte
Photo by snackariah licensed CC BY-SA 2.0

Grab your snorkelling gear — we’re headed to the ocean! Based in the national marine park, this underwater museum has over 500 life-size sculptures, including cars and buildings. But this is a museum with a green twist. The sculptures were specially designed to allow marine life to explore and even live. The sculptures were also made with special materials that help algae and coral grow.

But don’t worry if you’re not keen on being in the water, you can check out the museum from a glass-bottomed boat instead, or see the full-size replicas of the sculptures on-shore.


Enjoy museums? Read 7 coolest playtime museums around the world


Museum of Vampires – France

Garlic. Lots and lots of garlic.
Image via Pixabay

If you enjoy a good scare, head to this museum just on the edge of Paris. It’s run by Jacques Sirgent, who loves all things vampire-related, and it shows. His one-room museum may be small, but it’s packed full of some of the strangest things you’ll ever see.

From an anti-vampire protection kit to mummified pets, this museum is not for the faint of heart. Even the outdoor garden was designed to look like a cemetery.


The Hair Museum of Avanos – Turkey

Thousands of paper notes and locks of hair surround a woman walking through the museum
Photo by Jordan Sitkin licensed CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

How do you make it into the Guinness Book of World Records? Well, one way is to have around 16,000 samples of hair. These samples are all from women and housed in a cave-like area attached to a pottery centre.

And if any female visitors want to contribute, there are scissors around to chop off a lock and add it to the collection.


Be sure to read: 5 of the most unusual museums in Canada!


Sulabh International Museum of Toilets – India

Different toilet designs on display on the toilet museum.
Sajjad Hussain/Getty Images

This museum in New Delhi is dedicated to toilets throughout the ages from around the world. It contains historical toilets, photographs and even poems about toilets. You’ll learn interesting things like how a French emperor used a toilet with a thrown backdrop or how the most expensive toilet cost over $25.3 million dollars!

This museum has a purpose beyond just being different and fun — it was designed to educate people about sanitation, and it also researches and develops technology to improve sanitation in India.