FEBRUARY 4 – 20

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Sports

Curling

Rachel Homan lunges down on the ice as she lets go of the stone.
Rachel Homan of Canada competes against Britain in curling during the PyeongChang 2018. (Mark Ralston/Getty Images)

What's it all about?

Have you ever wanted to go bowling, but on slidey ice… and with brooms? If the answer is "yes, yes, yes!" then you should definitely check out curling.

How it's played

Things to watch for

A detailed view of the shoes and pants of the Norwegian team as they compete in curling at PyeongChang 2018. (Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
A detailed view of the shoes and pants of the Norwegian team as they compete in curling at PyeongChang 2018. (Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

One foot slides...

  • Curlers wear two different shoes when on the ice.
  • The shoe on the left foot is called the slider and lets that foot slide on the ice.
  • The shoe on the right foot is called the gripper and gives the athlete more traction on the ice.
Curling stones in the house during a match at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games. (Tim De Waele/Getty Images)
Curling stones in the house during a match at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games. (Tim De Waele/Getty Images)

Granite stones

  • Curling stones are made from a rare type of granite.
  • There are only two places in the world where they can get the granite: the Scottish Island of Ailsa Craig and Wales.
  • Since this granite is rare, they might have to use something else one day.
Canada's Ben Hebert and Marc Kennedy sweep the stone during the bronze final in curling at PyeongChang. (Wang Zhao/Getty Images)
Canada's Ben Hebert and Marc Kennedy sweep the stone during the bronze final in curling at PyeongChang. (Wang Zhao/Getty Images)

Hurry hard

  • The skip yells this to the sweepers once the stone is thrown.
  • It lets them know to begin sweeping the ice in front of the stone.
  • Sweeping the ice makes the stone curl less and travel farther.
Action packed facts.
  • Many believe that curling is named after the way the stones "curl" on the ice.

  • Curling is nicknamed "the roaring game" because of how the stones roar when going down the ice.

  • Curling ice isn't smooth — ice makers spray water droplets on it that form pebbles when they freeze. This helps the stones curl after they're thrown.

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