IDEAS   Schedule - March 2013

Friday, March 1
A BOW TO THE BOW
Lapsed cellist Eitan Cornfield enters a world of exotic materials, pirates, forgers and geniuses. Master bowmakers, dealers, collectors and musicians reveal a passion for the bow that rivals their passion for Strads and Guarneris


Monday, March 4
THE ENRIGHT FILES
Our monthly Monday night feature with Michael Enright, host of The Sunday Edition, in conversation with some of the most original and influential thinkers of our time.

Tuesday, March 5
THINGS WE LOST IN THE WAR, Part 2
The East African nation of Somalia is the definition of a failed state. It has been without a central government since 1991, when the country’s dictator Mohamed Siad Barre was overthrown. What followed were two decades of civil war, anarchy, failed Western intervention, Islamic fundamentalism and famine. Somali-born IDEAS contributor Hassan Ghedi Santur returns to his home-land to explore, “Things We Lost in the War.”

Wednesday, March 6
A WORD TO THE WISE, Part 2
Times have changed. So has the study of wisdom. Philosophers, make room for the scientists! In this two-part series, Marilyn Powell talks to psychologists, psychiatrists, neuroscientists - and the wise that dwell among us - about a very old topic. What they have discovered about the nature of wisdom and being wise will enlighten and surprise you.

Thursday, March 7
RETHINKING DEPRESSION, Part 1
Depression. It has been called the mean reds. The blue devils. The black dog. And through history, treatments for depression have varied wildly. In the Middle Ages, depressives were caged in asylums. In Victorian England, wealthier patients were sent to seaside resorts for a change of air. In the 1930's, procedures like lobotomies and electroconvulsive therapy were used. Psychiatry's tools were crude and limited.  No wonder then, when the Age of the Antidepressant arrived, it was considered psychiatry's triumph.  Prozac came onto the market in 1988, followed quickly by many similar drugs. But, since then, the number of people afflicted with depression has soared.  In this 3 part program, IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores the short and troubling history of the antidepressant.. Part 2 airs Thursday, March 14; Part 2 airs March 21.

Friday, March 8
CANADA GOES DEEP
In the spring of 2012, Canadian film-maker James Cameron made headlines with a solo submarine dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench - the deepest place in the world's oceans. Also on the expedition were a core group of Canadians, including Dr. Joe MacInnis, who prepared the official National Geographic Society blog.


Monday, March 11
PHILOSOPHY BITES
Philosophy doesn’t have to be an arcane subject. It’s about people thinking, and like Socrates, asking simple questions. Meet Nigel Warburton who wants to take philosophy off its pedestal and make it lucid and enjoyable. His A Little History of Philosophy is written for the young at heart and the curious adult.

Tuesday, March 12
NO APOLOGIES NECESSARY
At the 2012 London Olympics, the most interesting Canadian stories occurred during first the women’s and then the men’s triathlon races. IDEAS host Paul Kennedy talks to Olympians Simon Whitfield and Paula Findlay about what really happened, and what it means.

Wednesday, March 13
THE END OF GROWTH
Economist Jeff Rubin and environmentalist David Suzuki might seem an unlikely pairing. But they've been touring Canada together, talking about the natural limits to growth from their very different perspectives. We listen in as they try to convince a Calgary audience that we've already exceeded the capacity of the planet.

Thursday, March 14
RETHINKING DEPRESSION, Part 2
Depression. It has been called the mean reds. The blue devils. The black dog. And through history, treatments for depression have varied wildly. In the Middle Ages, depressives were caged in asylums. In Victorian England, wealthier patients were sent to seaside resorts for a change of air. In the 1930's, procedures like lobotomies and electroconvulsive therapy were used. Psychiatry's tools were crude and limited.  No wonder then, when the Age of the Antidepressant arrived, it was considered psychiatry's triumph.  Prozac came onto the market in 1988, followed quickly by many similar drugs. But, since then, the number of people afflicted with depression has soared.  In this 3 part program, IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores the short and troubling history of the antidepressant. Part 3 airs Thursday, March 21.

Friday, March 15
LEGENDS OF THE MIK’MAQ
The rich oral tradition of the Mi’kmaq is highlighted in four fascinating stories - stories of power and magic that provide insight into the culture of this First Nation from Canada’s east coast. CBC Radio’s Legends Project compiles traditional oral stories, legends and histories of Canada’s Inuit and First Nations, gathered in communities across the country.


Monday, March 18
SPINOZA
Baruch Spinoza was a 17th century lens grinder known for his precision optical work. But it was his philosophy that made this Dutch-Jewish thinker famous, then and now. IDEAS host Paul Kennedy explores how Spinoza's thoughts on God, the universe, ethics and politics helped ignite the flame that became the Enlightenment.

Tuesday, March 19
WACHTEL ON THE ARTS
A monthly IDEAS feature with CBC Radio’s celebrated arts journalist Eleanor Wachtel. Each month, she takes an in-depth look at what’s new, exciting and important in film, opera, the visual arts, theatre, dance and architecture.

Wednesday, March 20
THE SIGNAL OF NOISE

Once long past, listening gave clues for survival. Now we listen unconsciously, blocking noise and tuning in to what we want to hear. Yet the unwanted sounds we filter out tell us a lot about our environment and our lives. Broadcaster Teresa Goff listens for the messages in our walls of sound.

Thursday, March 21
RETHINKING DEPRESSION, Part 3
Depression. It has been called the mean reds. The blue devils. The black dog. And through history, treatments for depression have varied wildly. In the Middle Ages, depressives were caged in asylums. In Victorian England, wealthier patients were sent to seaside resorts for a change of air. In the 1930's, procedures like lobotomies and electroconvulsive therapy were used. Psychiatry's tools were crude and limited.  No wonder then, when the Age of the Antidepressant arrived, it was considered psychiatry's triumph.  Prozac came onto the market in 1988, followed quickly by many similar drugs. But, since then, the number of people afflicted with depression has soared.  In this 3 part program, IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores the short and troubling history of the antidepressant.

Friday, March 22
THE FOUR SEASONS OF MAVIS GALLANT
Mavis Gallant has written dozens of dazzling, sardonic, heart-breaking short stories. She is acknowledged as a master of the short-story and has been showered with honours. Yet she is not well known in her home country - Canada.  Now in her 90th year, she still lives in the same small Parisian apartment she moved into almost 50 years ago. Rome-based writer and journalist Megan Williams spent almost a week with Gallant in Paris, recording material for her documentary portrait:  "The Four Seasons of Mavis Gallant."


Monday, March 25 - Friday, March 29
THE UNIVERSE WITHIN: FROM QUANTUM TO COSMOS - THE 2012 CBC MASSEY LECTURES BY NEIL TUROK
All the technologies we use and depend on are the products of the amazing human mind. Our curiosity drives us to seek out the underlying laws of the universe, and the more we learn the better our lives become. But we're arriving at an impasse, says physicist Neil Turok: the more we learn, the more contradictory the laws seem to be. We need new ideas and new ways of thinking to go beyond the horizon.