Revising History, Part 2

June 1970. South Vietnamese Marines rush to the point where a descending U.S. Army helicopter will pick them up after a sweep east of the Cambodian town of Prey Veng during the Vietnam War. Photograph by Nick Ut (AP)

June 1970. South Vietnamese Marines rush to the point where a descending U.S. Army helicopter will pick them up after a sweep east of the Cambodian town of Prey Veng during the Vietnam War. Photograph by Nick Ut (AP)

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What happens when historians go searching for new evidence about the nation's past? It can change the way its citizens think about their country as well as their identity. And it can upset both citizens and those who govern them. Historian Robert Johnson speaks to some American historians who are asking us to reconsider America's role in the Vietnam War.

Listen to Part 1 of Revising History (broadcast April 3)



Robert Johnson is a professor of history at the University of Toronto.


Participants in the program: (in order of appearance)

Margaret MacMillan, Professor of History and Warden of St. Antony's College, Oxford University; author of The Uses and Abuses of History.

Col. David Glantz, U.S. Army (retired); author, Zhukov's Greatest Defeat: The Red Army's Epic Disaster in Operation Mars, 1942; and Colossus Reborn: The Red Army at War; editor, Journal of Slavic Military Studies.

Robert McNamara (1916-2009) served as U.S. Secretary of Defense, 1961-1957.

Mark Lawrence, Professor of History and Senior Fellow at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at The University of Texas at Austin, TX.

James McAllister, Professor of Political Science, Williams College, Williamstown, MA.

Mark Moyar, Senior Fellow at the Joint Special Operations University. He served previously as Kim T. Adamson Chair of Insurgency and Terrorism at the U.S. Marine Corps University.

John Prados, Senior Researcher, National Security Archive, Washington, DC.

Frederik Logevall, John S. Knight Professor of International Studies and Director, Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

Keith Taylor, Professor of Vietnamese Studies, Department of Asian Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.



A List of Relevant Readings

Jessica M. Chapman, Cauldron of Resistance: Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States and 1950s Southern Vietnam.

Mark Lawrence, The Vietnam War: A Concise International History

Mark Lawrence, Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Commitment to War in Vietnam.

Michael Lind, Vietnam: The Necessary War.

Frederik Logevall, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam, (winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in History).

Frederik Logevall, Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam.
 
Edward Miller, Misalliance: Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and the Fate of South Vietnam.

Margaret MacMillan, Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of History.

Mark Moyar, Triumph Forsaken: The Vietnam War, 1954-1965.
 
Mark Moyar, Phoenix and the Birds of Prey: Counterinsurgency and Counterterrorism in Vietnam.

Lien-Hang Nguyen, Hanoi's War: An International History of the War for Peace in Vietnam.

John Prados, Vietnam: The History of an Unwinnable War.

Lewis Sorley, A Better War: The Unexamined Victories and Final Tragedy of America's Last Years in Vietnam.

Triumph Revisited: Historians Battle for the Vietnam War, edited by Andrew Wiest and Michael J. Doidge.

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