Books

Why The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood makes Marjorie Dowhos feel proud

"In a year in which we are celebrating Canada's 150th, seeing the success a Canadian author like Margaret Atwood has achieved on an international level is astounding and it makes you feel proud," says the host of Radio Noon.
Marjorie Dowhos has worked as a television and radio journalist across Western Canada in communities like Medicine Hat, Fort McMurray and Fort St. John. (CBC/McClelland & Stewart)

July 1, 2017 marks 150 years since Confederation in Canada. CBC Books is creating the great Canadian reading list — a list of 150 books curated by you. 

Marjorie Dowhos, host of Radio Noon on CBC Radio One in Manitoba, chose The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood.

"Controversial and eye opening, The Handmaid's Tale is a book that is an interesting and good read from cover to cover. It addresses many aspects of life from political to social, by exploring gender equality and femininity through the rise of infertility and the growing concerns over pollution and science. The book's main character, Offred, represents the struggles women face, like finding a voice in a world dominated by men. However, the book also shows women have an important role to play in this world and hold an important status.

"In a year in which we are celebrating Canada's 150th, seeing the success a Canadian author like Margaret Atwood has achieved on an international level is astounding and it makes you feel proud. The book has even sparked a TV series. Many Canadians have appreciated this book for decades and it now looks like the rest of the world is catching on."

Marjorie Dowhos is the host of Radio Noon on CBC Radio One 89.3 FM / 990 AM. Marjorie joined CBC Manitoba in 2010 and has worked as a reporter and most recently as host of CBC Winnipeg News at 11.

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