Books

Why Jonna Brewer believes No Great Mischief by Alistair MacLeod is 'such a true Canadian read'

"Accompanying my parents back to the island on many summer and holiday trips, then bringing my own children there, has deepened my understanding of the enduring attachment to [Cape Breton]," says the host of Information Morning Moncton.
Jonna Brewer has done many jobs during her years at CBC Moncton, from reporter to executive producer. (CBC/Emblem Editions)

July 1, 2017 marks 150 years since Confederation in Canada. CBC Books is creating the great Canadian reading list — a list of 150 books curated by you. 

Jonna Brewer, host of Information Morning Moncton, adds No Great Mischief by Alistair MacLeod to the reading list.

"I am partial to this book for many reasons. My family's roots are in Cape Breton, with ancestors from Scotland (and Ireland and England), so I have heard the stories of their arrival and their instant connection to Cape Breton. Accompanying my parents back to the island on many summer and holiday trips, then bringing my own children there, has deepened my understanding of the enduring attachment to that place. No matter how long you've been away or how far you've travelled, just thinking about Cape Breton can evoke feelings of homesickness and a longing to 'cross the causeway' again. That sense of connection could probably be said of many places across this country, which makes this such a true Canadian read.

"I had the pleasure of interviewing Mr. MacLeod before he passed away. We talked about this book and his writing process. Immediately after, I read No Great Mischief again with a new appreciation and admiration for every character and every carefully chosen word."

Jonna Brewer has been with the CBC since 1988, starting as an editorial assistant in the national radio newsroom in Toronto after graduating from the University of King's College. A native Maritimer who was ready to move anywhere, it was a happy coincidence when a reporting job opened in Moncton.

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