Books·Canadian

This One Looks Like a Boy

This One Looks Like a Boy is a memoir by Lorimer Shenher.

Lorimer Shenher

Since he was a small child, Lorimer Shenher knew something for certain: he was a boy. The problem was, he was growing up in a girl's body.

In this candid and thoughtful memoir, Shenher shares the story of his gender journey, from childhood gender dysphoria to teenage sexual experimentation to early-adult denial of his identity — and finally the acceptance that he is trans, culminating in gender reassignment surgery in his 50s. Along the way, he details his childhood in booming Calgary, his struggles with alcohol, and his eventual move to Vancouver, where he became the first detective assigned to the case of serial killer Robert Pickton (the subject of his critically acclaimed book That Lonely Section of Hell). With warmth and openness, This One Looks Like A Boy takes us through one of the most important decisions Shenher will ever make, as he comes into his own and finally discovers acceptance and relief. (From Greystone Books)

Interviews with Lorimer Shenher 

Lorimer Shenher knew he was transgender from a young age, but did not transition until later in life. He has written about the experience in his new book This One Looks Like a Boy: My Gender Journey to Life as a Man. 25:29
Do the Bruce McArthur LGBT murders mirror the Robert Pickton case? Pickton lead investigator Lorimer Shenher tells the CBC’s Wendy Mesley how bias may have played a role in both cases 3:39
Lorimer Shenher says there's a double standard when it comes to sexual assault warnings. Why are victims told to change their behaviour, while offenders are rarely mentioned? 6:30
"Standing here now, I don't feel that much. It's like a lot of historical landmarks now: it's a place where you know terrible things happened, but a lot has changed," said Lorimer Shenher, a former Vancouver Police Department detective. 6:03

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