Books·Canadian

The Unexpected Cop

The Unexpected Cop is a memoir by Ernie Louttit.

Ernie Louttit

The cop who blew the whistle on Saskatoon's notorious "Starlight Tours," Ernie Louttit is the bestselling author of two previous "Indian Ernie" books. He demonstrates in this latest title that being a leader means sticking to your convictions and sometimes standing up to the powers that be. One of the first Indigenous officers hired by the Saskatoon Police, he was an outsider who became an insider, with a difference. A former military man with a passion for the law, he was tough on the beat, but was also a role model for kids on the streets. (From University of Regina Press)

Why Ernie Louttit wrote The Unexpected Cop

"When I act as a public speaker, I found myself sneaking in stories about stuff I hadn't written about before. I found that people were very receptive to it. I realized I was laying the seeds for a new book and should probably write it. I was also inspired by today's social media, where people communicate in short sound bites with strong positions without any context. I wanted this book to reflect things that I have an opinion on.

This is the main thing I would love people to take away from the book [is] that they can have the skill set to be a leader.- Ernie Louttit

"​Leadership is everyone's responsibility. Eventually everybody has to step up at some point. This is the main thing I would love people to take away from the book [is] that they can have the skill set to be a leader."

Read more in his interview with CBC Books.

Interviews with Ernie Louttit

Saskatoon police officer has been first to the scene of many homicides, Dan Zakreski reports. 2:11
Retired police officer Ernie Louttit says Saskatchewan police, and the public, would be well served by outfitting officers with assault rifles. 1:05
The retired police sergeant talks about his experiences patrolling Saskatoon's inner city. (First broadcast March 31, 2014.) 10:40

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