Books

The Remains of the Day

Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day is a haunting meditation on the high cost of duty.

Kazuo Ishiguro

The Remains of the Day is a spellbinding portrayal of a vanished way of life and a haunting meditation on the high cost of duty. It is also one of the most subtle, sad and humorous love stories ever written. It is the summer of 1956, when Stevens, a man who has dedicated himself to his career as a perfect butler in the one-time great house of Darlington Hall, sets off on a holiday that will take him deep into the English countryside and, unexpectedly, into his own past, especially his friendship with the housekeeper, Miss Kenton. As memories surface of his lifetime "in service" to Lord Darlington, and of his life between the wars, when the fate of the continent seemed to lie in the hands of a few men, he finds himself confronting the dark undercurrent beneath the carefully run world of his employer. (From Knopf Canada)

The Remains of the Day won the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 1989. It was also adapted into a film starring Sir Anthony Hopkins. 

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