Canadian

The Reality Bubble

The Reality Bubble is a nonfiction book by Ziya Tong.

Ziya Tong

From one of Canada's most engaging science journalists, a groundbreaking and wonder-filled look at the hidden things that shape our lives in unexpected and sometimes dangerous ways.

Our naked eyes see only a thin sliver of reality. We are blind in comparison to the X-rays that peer through skin, the mass spectrometers that detect the dead inside the living, or the high-tech surveillance systems that see with artificial intelligence.

And we are blind compared to the animals that can see in infrared, or ultraviolet, or in 360-degree vision. These animals live in the same world we do, but they see something quite different when they look around.

With all of the curiosity and flair that drives her broadcasting, Ziya Tong reveals to us this hidden world, and takes us on a journey to examine ten of humanity's biggest blind spots.

What she reveals is our blindness to a dimension of our society that is kept secret from us. There are cameras everywhere, she reminds us, except where our food comes from, where our energy comes from, and where our waste goes. Our blindness to the conditions that sustain us makes it impossible to navigate our future.

This vitally important new book shows how science, and the curiosity that drives it, can help civilization flourish by opening our eyes to the landscape laid out before us. Fast-paced, utterly fascinating, and deeply humane, The Reality Bubble gives voice to the sense we've all had--that there is more to the world than meets the eye. (From Allen Lane)

The Reality Bubble is available in May 2019.

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