Books

The Nickel Boys

A novel by Colson Whitehead.

Colson Whitehead

As the Civil Rights movement begins to reach the black enclave of Frenchtown in segregated Tallahassee, Florida, Elwood Curtis takes the words of Dr. Martin Luther King to heart: he is "as good as anyone." Abandoned by his parents, but kept on the straight and narrow by his grandmother, Elwood is about to enroll in the local black college. But for a black boy in the American South in the early 1960s, one innocent mistake is enough to destroy the future. Elwood is sentenced to a juvenile reformatory called The Nickel Academy, whose mission statement says it provides "physical, intellectual and moral training" so the delinquent boys in their charge can become "honorable and honest men."

In reality, The Nickel Academy is a grotesque chamber of horrors, where the sadistic staff beats and sexually abuses the students, corrupt officials and locals steal food and supplies, and any boy who resists is likely to disappear "out back." Stunned to find himself in such a vicious environment, Elwood tries to hold on to Dr. King's ringing assertion "throw us in jail and we will still love you." His friend Turner thinks Elwood is worse than naive, that the world is crooked and the only way to survive is to scheme and avoid trouble.

The tension between Elwood's ideals and Turner's skepticism leads to a decision whose repercussions will echo down the decades. Formed in the crucible of the evils Jim Crow wrought, the boys' fates will be determined by what they endured at The Nickel Academy.

Based on the true story of a reform school in Florida that operated for 111 years and warped the lives of thousands of children, The Nickel Boys is a devastating, driven narrative that showcases a great American novelist writing at the height of his powers. (From Doubleday Canada)

From the book

Elwood received the best gift of his life on Christmas Day 1962, even if the ideas it put it in his head were his undoing. Martin Luther King At Zion Hill was the only album he owned and it never left the turntable. His grandmother Hattie had a few gospel records, which she only played when the world discovered a new mean way to work on her, and Elwood wasn't allowed to listen to the Motown groups or popular songs like that on account of their licentious nature. The rest of his presents that year were clothes – a new red sweater, socks – and he certainly wore those out, but nothing endured such good and constant use as the record. Every scratch and pop it gathered over the months was a mark of his enlightenment, tracking each time he entered into a new understanding of the Reverend's words. The crackle of truth.


From The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead ©2019. Published by Doubleday Canada.

Interviews with Colson Whitehead

The Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning author of The Underground Railroad joined Tom Power in the q studio to tell us about his highly-anticipated follow-up novel, The Nickel Boys. 18:56
What if the Underground Railroad really was a network of secret trains that brought runaway slaves to freedom? That's the premise of Colson Whitehead's acclaimed novel, "The Underground Railroad." He speaks with Eleanor about blending fact and fiction. 51:35
The best-selling author opens up about the story he has waited years to write. 15:35

More about The Nickel Boys

TIME magazine recently said that 'by mining the past, novelist Colson Whitehead takes readers into an uneasy present.' His latest novel, The Nickel Boys, is already being widely celebrated, but should you read it? Day 6 books columnist Becky Toyne weighs in. 7:57

Other books by Colson Whitehead

 

 

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