Books·Canadian

The Narrows of Fear

Carol Rose GoldenEagle's novel is an interweaving of stories centred on a range of characters, both male and female, though the women, for the most part, are the healers.

Carol Rose GoldenEagle

The Narrows of Fear (Wapawikoscikanik) navigates the unsettling, but necessary. When love of, and respect for, culture goes awry, it is our Indigenous women who bring us back to what is important. This novel is an interweaving of stories centred on a range of characters, both male and female, though the women, for the most part, are the healers. Though several were abused both in their own community and in residential schools, these women are smart and loving and committed to helping one another. They eagerly learn to celebrate their culture, its stories, its dancing, its drums and its elders.

Principal of these elders is Nina, the advisor at the women's shelter. With the help of Sandy and Charlene, both of whom are educated and courageous, overcoming losses of their own, Nina uses Indigenous practices to heal the traumatized Mary Ann. This is a very powerful novel — sometimes brutally violent, sometimes healing, sometimes mythical and always deeply respectful of the Aboriginal culture at its heart. (From Inanna Publications)

Carol Rose GoldenEagle is a Cree and Dene author from Saskatchewan. She is the author of the novels Bearskin Diary and Bone Black and the poetry collection  Hiraeth.

Interviews with Carol Rose GoldenEagle

The Cree/Dene writer and journalist Carol Rose GoldenEagle on her thriller Bone Black, about an Indigenous woman who takes justice into her own hands when the system fails her. 16:14

Books by Carol Rose GoldenEagle

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