Books·Canadian

The Forgotten Daughter

The Forgotten Daughter is a book by Joanna Goodman.

Joanna Goodman

1992: French-Canadian factions renew Quebec's fight to gain independence, and wild, beautiful Véronique Fortin, daughter of a radical separatist convicted of kidnapping and murdering a prominent politician in 1970, has embraced her father's cause. So it is a surprise when she falls for James Phénix, a journalist of French-Canadian heritage who opposes Quebec separatism. Their love affair is as passionate as it is turbulent, as they negotiate a constant struggle between love and morals.

At the same time, James's older sister, Elodie Phénix, one of the Duplessis Orphans, becomes involved with a coalition demanding justice and reparations for their suffering in the 1950s when Quebec's orphanages were converted to mental hospitals, a heinous political act of Premier Maurice Duplessis which affected 5,000 children.

Véronique is the only person Elodie can rely on as she fights for retribution, reliving her trauma, while Elodie becomes a sisterly presence for Véronique, who continues to struggle with her family's legacy.

The Forgotten Daughter is a moving portrait of true love, familial bonds, and persistence in the face of injustice. As each character is pushed to their moral brink, they will discover exactly which lines they'll cross—and just how far they'll go for what they believe in. (From HarperCollins Canada)

Joanna Goodman is a novelist originally from Montreal and now living in Toronto. She is also the author of The Home for Unwanted Girls.

Interviews with Joanna Goodman

Joanna Goodman on her novel "The Home for Unwanted Girls," which is partly based on the true story of the Duplessis Orphans, who were falsely certified as mentally ill in the 1950s in Quebec. 2:58

Other books by Joanna Goodman

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