Books·Canadian

The Diamond House

The Diamond House is a novel by Dianne Warren.

Dianne Warren

Estella Diamond is the youngest child and only daughter of a successful brick-factory owner, a self-described family man who is not averse to being called a kingpin. Estella's precocious nature leads her to discover something none of her brothers know: that their father was once married to an aspiring ceramics artist named Salina, who dreamed big and turned her back on society's conventions.

Estella grows up planning her future in the image of her father's daring first wife, rather than that of her traditional mother. When her plans are derailed again and again by the family patriarchy, she longs to rebel and be like Salina. Unable to openly challenge her father, and with a chorus of sisters-in-law passing judgment, she does the right thing instead, and plays the role of the good daughter.

Until she doesn't.

The effects of Estella's rebellion will stay with her and the family for years, until she is left alone in the house her father built with only her housekeeper, Emyflor, for company. When an uncompromising young woman named Hannah Diamond enters her world, Estella is forced to wrestle with the legacy she helped create and to confront the woman she has become, just in time for one last reinvention. (From HarperCollins Canada)

The Diamond House is available in June 2020.

Dianne Warren is a writer and dramatist from Saskatchewan. Her novel Cool Water won the Governor General's Literary Award for fiction in 2010.

Interviews with Dianne Warren

To mark Canada 150 we've been asking writers to tell us about a book they think best captures their part of Canada. Sharon Butala, who has lived most of her life in Saskatchewan on a ranch talks about Dianne Warren's "Cool Water." 1:56
The Saskatchewan author talks about her new novel, and why small towns make ideal settings. 2:31

Other books by Dianne Warren

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.