Books

The bestselling Canadian books for the week of Sept. 21-28, 2019

Bestseller lists are compiled by Bookmanager using weekly sales stats from over 260 Canadian independent stores.

Here are the bestselling Canadian books for Sept. 21-28, 2019.

Bestseller lists are compiled by Bookmanager using weekly sales stats from over 260 Canadian independent stores.

Canadian fiction | Canadian nonfiction | Canadian kids

Canadian fiction

Margaret Atwood is the author of The Testaments. (McClelland & Stewart)

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood is the #1 Canadian fiction book this week.

The Testaments is set 15 years after the events of The Handmaid's Tale and includes the "explosive testaments" of three women. It promises to answer readers' questions on the inner workings of Gilead, the oppressive dystopia where Offred, the novel's original narrator, was stripped of her freedoms and forced to be a handmaid for powerful men.

See the full Canadian fiction list below.

  1. The Testaments by Margaret Atwood
  2. A Better Man by Louise Penny
  3. The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
  4. The Innocents by Michael Crummey
  5. Women Talking by Miriam Toews
  6. Albatross by Terry Fallis
  7. Akin by Emma Donoghue
  8. Empire of Wild by Cherie Dimaline
  9. Split Tooth by Tanya Tagaq
  10. Washington Black by Esi Edugyan

Canadian nonfiction

On Fire is a nonfiction book by Naomi Klein. (Kourosh Keshiri, Simon & Schuster)

On Fire by Naomi Klein is the #1 Canadian nonfiction book this week.

Klein is an award-winning journalist, bestselling author, political thinker and outspoken advocate regarding climate change and the ills of corporate globalization. Her latest book, On Fire, examines how bold climate action can be a blueprint for a just and thriving society.

See the full Canadian nonfiction list below.

  1. On Fire by Naomi Klein
  2. Truth Be Told by Beverley McLachlin
  3. From Where I Stand by Jody Wilson-Raybould
  4. 21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act by Bob Joseph
  5. The Wake by Linden MacIntyre
  6. Murdered Midas by Charlotte Gray
  7. From the Ashes by Jesse Thistle
  8. Power Shift by Sally Armstrong
  9. High School by Tegan Quin and Sara Quin
  10. Embers by Richard Wagamese

Canadian kids

Phyllis's Orange Shirt is a children's book by Phyllis Webstad and illustrated by Brock Nicol. (orangeshirtday.org, Medicine Wheel Education)

Phyllis's Orange Shirt  by Phyllis Webstad and illustrated by Brock Nicol is the #1 Canadian kids book this week.

Phyllis's Orange Shirt tells the story of Webstad's experience of being stripped of a brand new, orange shirt on her first day attending residential school when she was just six years old. Losing her beloved clothing and her sense of identity at such a young age, Webstad's story is the inspiration behind Sept. 30 being Orange Shirt Day, which is an annual opportunity for people of all ages to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors and their families.   

See the full Canadian kids book list below.

  1. Phyllis's Orange Shirt by Phyllis Webstad, illustrated by Brock Nicol
  2. The Orange Shirt Story by Phyllis Webstad, illustrated by Brock Nicol
  3. The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline
  4. Sharon, Lois and Bram's Skinnamarink by, Sharon Hampson, Lois Lilienstein and Bram Morrison, with Randi Hampson, illustrated by Qin Leng
  5. Love You Forever by Robert Munsch, illustrated by Sheila McGraw
  6. When We Were Alone by David A. Robertson, illustrated by Julie Flett
  7. The Paper Bag Princess by Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko
  8. Small in the City by Sydney Smith
  9. Sweep by Jonathan Auxier
  10. Fairy Science by Ashley Spires

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