Books

The Barnabus Project by the Fan Brothers among finalists for Canadian Children's Book Centre Awards

The six awards, which include prizes for nonfiction, YA and picture books, annually recognize the best in Canadian children's literature.

The six awards recognize the best in Canadian children's literature

The Barnabus Project is a picture book by the Fan Brothers. (Tundra Books)

The finalists for the 2021 Canadian Children's Book Centre Awards have been revealed. The six awards, which include prizes for nonfiction, YA and picture books, annually recognize the best in Canadian children's literature.

The Barnabus Project by the Fan Brothers is nominated for two awards: the $50,000 TD Canadian Children's Literature Award, which recognizes the best Canadian book for readers up to age 12 in any genre, and the $20,000 Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award, which is for the best Canadian picture book of the year.

The Barnabus Project is a picture book about a secret underground lab and a host of genetically engineered creatures. Barnabus and his friends live in this lab but they are deemed imperfect and might never see the outside world. But Barnabus yearns to be free and decides that it's time for he and his imperfect friends to make the perfect escape.

The Barnabus Project also won the 2020 Governor General's Literary Prize for young people's literature — illustrated books.

Eric Fan and Terry Fan are brothers and frequent collaborators on children's books. Their books include The Night Gardener and Ocean Meets SkyThey also illustrated The Darkest Dark by Chris Hadfield.

Devin Fan is an artist, poet and youth worker. The Barnabus Project is his first children's book and marks the first time all three brothers have written and illustrated a picture book together.

Journal of a Travelling Girl by Nadine Neema, illustrated by Archie Beaverho is also nominated for two awards. It is a finalist for the Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People and the Jean Little First Novel Award.

Journal of a Travelling Girl is a middle-grade novel about an 11-year-old girl named Julia, who takes a canoe journey through the lands of the Tlicho People. Along the way, Julia connects with her culture, their traditions and her ancestors.

Neema is an Egyptian Lebanese Canadian writer, artist and workshop facilitator. As a musical artist, she has released four albums. She has worked with the Ticho community since 1999.

Beaverho is a Dene artist and painter. Journal of a Travelling Girl is his first illustrated book.

Other notable finalists include the middle-grade novel The Barren Grounds by David A. Robertson, which is nominated for the TD Canadian Children's Literature Award, the picture book Our Little Kitchen by Jillian Tamaki, which is a finalist for the Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award, 

2021 marks the first year of the Jean Little First Novel Award. The $5,000 prize recognizes the first book by a Canadian writer for young people.

The winners will be announced on Oct. 29, 2021.

You can see the finalists for all six awards below.

The finalists for the $50,000 TD Canadian Children's Literature Award are:

The finalists for the $20,000 Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award are:

The $10,000 Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children's Non-Fiction recognizes nonfiction for readers up to age 18.

The finalists are:

The $5,000 Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People recognizes historical fiction for readers up to age 18.

The finalists are:

The $5,000 Amy Mathers Teen Book Award recognizes Canadian young adult books for readers between the ages of 13 and 18.

The finalists are:

The $5,000 Jean Little First Novel Award recognizes the first book by a Canadian writer for young people.

The finalists are:

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now