Books·Canadian

The Age of Creativity

A moving portrait of a father and daughter relationship and a case for late-stage creativity from Emily Urquhart.

Emily Urquhart

When Emily Urquhart and her family celebrated the 80th birthday of her father, the illustrious painter Tony Urquhart, she found it remarkable that, although his pace had slowed, he was continuing his daily art practice of drawing, painting and constructing large-scale sculptures, and was even innovating his style. Was he defying the odds, or is it possible that some assumptions about the elderly are flat-out wrong? After all, many well-known visual artists completed their best work in the last decade of their lives, Turner, Monet and Cézanne among them. With the eye of a memoirist and the curiosity of a journalist, Urquhart began an investigation into late-stage creativity, asking: Is it possible that our best work is ahead of us? Is there an expiry date on creativity? Do we ever really know when we've done anything for the last time?

Emily Urquhart reveals how creative work, both amateur and professional, sustains people in the third act of their lives, and tells a new story about the possibilities of elder-hood. (From The Walrus Books)

Emily Urquhart is a writer and folklorist currently living in Kitchener, Ont. She is also the author of the memoir Beyond the Pale.

Interviews with Emily Urquhart

Emily Urquhart says for a long time she assumed her father's abilities as a painter would diminish with age. But what really happened challenged conventional wisdom and her own.
The folklorist and author talks about how her daughter's albinism set her on a quest to understand the condition. The result is her book, Beyond the Pale: Folklore, Family and the Mystery of Our Hidden Genes.

Other books by Emily Urquhart

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