Books·Canadian

Strange Heaven

Lynn Coady's debut novel is about a teen girl who prefers living in the psych ward to spending time with her troubled family.

Lynn Coady

She's depressed, they say. Apathetic. Bridget Murphy, almost eighteen, has had it with her zany family. When she is transferred to the psych ward after giving birth and putting her baby up for adoption, it is a welcome relief — even with the manic ranting of a teen stripper and come-ons of another delusional inmate.

But this oasis of relative calm is short-lived. Christmas is coming, and Uncle Albert arrives to whisk her back to the bedlam of home and the booze-soaked social life that got her into trouble in the first place. Her grandmother raves from her bed, banging the wall with a bedpan through a litany of profanities. Her father curses while her mother tries to keep the lid on developmentally delayed Uncle Rollie. The baby's father wants to sue her, and her friends don't get that she's changed. (From Goose Lane)

From the book

She comes to naught, my dear one, she comes to naught, all that there business. What the hell, maybe twice in your life you have yourself a whore of a good time, and then you spend every night of the rest of your life trying to get that good time back. But she comes to naught.


From Strange Heaven by Lynn Coady ©2010. Published by Goose Lane.

Interviews with Lynn Coady

In this edition of Storytellers, author Lynn Coady recounts finding her voice as a writer in rural Cape Breton. 2:30

More about Strange Heaven

TNC listener Ellen Helleur finds a Canadian companion to Girl on Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen. 1:47

Other books by Lynn Coady

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