Books

Read work from Thomas King's first poetry collection, 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin

Before turning 77 in 2020, the celebrated Indigenous writer has penned a collection of 77 poems about loss and reconciliation.
77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin is a poetry collection by Thomas King. (HarperCollins Canada)

Thomas King is a celebrated writer of fiction, nonfiction and children's literature. His diverse archive of writing includes the nonfiction book The Inconvenient Indian, a past Canada Reads contender that broke open Indigenous stereotypes and identity.

He's been a Governor General's Literary Award nominee three times, winning the fiction category in 2014 for his novel The Back of the Turtle.

Shelagh's conversation with Thomas King about his novel "The Back of the Turtle". It's the winner of the 2014 Governor General's Award for Fiction. 39:27

In 2020, King will turn 77 years old. He marks this milestone with his first poetry collection, 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin.

The book is comprised of 77 poems that lament what we have lost, lecture us for what we have allowed and looks at what we might still be able to save if we want to keep society prosperous and healthy.

Here are a few fragments from King's new book.

An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)
An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)
An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)
An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)
An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)

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