Books

Ojibway journalist and author Tanya Talaga writing three nonfiction books, the first to be published in 2023

The first book, which has yet to be named, will focus on residential schools and explore why the discovery of the unmarked graves has finally resonated with Canadians and the world. 

The first book of a three-book deal will focus on the legacy of Canada’s residential school system

Tanya Talaga is a journalist and author of the books Seven Fallen Feathers and All Our Relations. (Vancouver Writers Festival)

Author, journalist and Massey lecturer Tanya Talaga has signed a three-book deal with Canadian publisher HarperCollins Canada.

The first book, which has yet to be named, is set to publish in 2023. The book will focus on Canada's residential school system and explore why the discovery of the unmarked graves has finally resonated with Canadians and the world. 

Talaga is the Ojibway author of the RBC Taylor Prize-winning book Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death and Hard Truths in a Northern City, which delves into the history of Thunder Bay through the deaths of seven Indigenous high school students. 

Talaga, an Ontario-based investigative journalist of Anishinaabe and Polish descent, has received two National Newspaper Awards recognizing her work on investigative projects. In 2017, she was named the Atkinson Fellow for public policy. The work produced during this period formed the basis of her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures, All Our Relations.

"The Indian Residential School was a pillar of Canada's genocidal policies against Indigenous Peoples. Every Indigenous family is touched by the trauma of the 'schools.' Those places did the opposite of nurturing and educating," Talaga said in a statement.

"Canada hoped the world wouldn't notice — but it has. All of our communities, our families, know the stories of the lost, those stolen from us. It is time the children are honoured and their voices heard. I'm beyond grateful to HarperCollins for understanding this is the book we need now."

The book deal was brokered by Michael Levine, chairman of Westwood Creative Artists.

'This is not ancient history, this is something that we are still living with now' | Tanya Talaga

1 year ago
Duration 6:34
Author and columnist Tanya Talaga joins Power & Politics to discuss the path forward after a First Nation says it found the remains of 215 Indigenous children at the site of a former residential school

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

now