Books·Canadian

Nobody Ever Talks About Anything But the End

Nobody Ever Talks About Anything But the End is a book by Liz Levine.

Liz Levine

I feel like I might be a terrible person to be laughing in these moments. But it turns out, I'm not alone.

In November of 2016, Liz Levine's younger sister, Tamara, reached a breaking point after years of living with mental illness. In the dark hours before dawn, she sent a final message to her family then killed herself.

In Nobody Ever Talks About Anything But the End, Liz weaves the story of what happened to Tamara with another significant death — that of Liz's childhood love, Judson, to cancer. She writes about her relationship with Judson, Tamara's struggles, the conflicts that arise in a family of challenging personalities, and how death casts a long shadow. This memorable account of life and loss is haunting yet filled with dark humor — Tamara emails her family when Trump is elected to check if she's imagining things again, Liz discovers a banana has been indicted as a whistleblower in an alleged family conspiracy, and a little niece declares Tamara's funeral the "most fun ever!"

With honesty, Liz exposes the raw truths about grief and mourning that we often shy away from — and almost never share with others. And she reveals how, in the midst of death, life — with all its messy complications — must also be celebrated. (From Simon & Schuster)

Levine is a television and film producer who has worked on Story of a Girl and jPod. Her writing has appeared in the National Post, The Walrus and the Vancouver Sun. Nobody Ever Talks About Anything But the End is her first book.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now