Books

Maid

Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother's Will to Survive is a memoir of living in poverty.

Stephanie Land

 

At 28, Stephanie Land's plans of breaking free from the roots of her hometown in the Pacific Northwest to chase her dreams of attending a university and becoming a writer, were cut short when a summer fling turned into an unexpected pregnancy. She turned to housekeeping to make ends meet, and with a tenacious grip on her dream to provide her daughter the very best life possible, Stephanie worked days and took classes online to earn a college degree, and began to write relentlessly. 

She wrote the true stories that weren't being told: the stories of overworked and underpaid Americans. Of living on food stamps and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) coupons to eat. Of the government programs that provided her housing, but that doubled as halfway houses. The aloof government employees who called her lucky for receiving assistance while she didn't feel lucky at all. She wrote to remember the fight, to eventually cut through the deep-rooted stigmas of the working poor. 

Maid explores the underbelly of upper-middle class America and the reality of what it's like to be in service to them. "I'd become a nameless ghost," Stephanie writes about her relationship with her clients, many of whom do not know her from any other cleaner, but who she learns plenty about. As she begins to discover more about her clients' lives-their sadness and love, too-she begins to find hope in her own path. 

Her compassionate, unflinching writing as a journalist gives voice to the "servant" worker, and those pursuing the American Dream from below the poverty line. Maid is Stephanie's story, but it's not her alone. It is an inspiring testament to the strength, determination, and ultimate triumph of the human spirit. (From Hachette Books)

From the book

My daughter learned to walk in a homeless shelter. 

It was an afternoon in June, the day before her first birthday. I perched on the shelter's threadbare love seat, holding up an old digital camera to capture her first steps. Mia's tangled hair and thinly striped onesie contrasted with the determination in her brown eyes as she flexed and curled her toes for balance. From behind the camera, I took in the folds of her ankles, the rolls of her thighs, and the roundness of her belly. She babbled as she made her way toward me, barefoot across the tiled floor. Years of dirt were etched into that floor. As hard as I scrubbed, I could never get it clean. 

It was the final week of our ninety-day stay in a cabin unit on the north side of Port Townsend, allotted by the housing authority for those without a home. Next, we'd move into transitional housing—an old, run-down apartment complex with cement floors that doubled as a halfway house. However temporary, I had done my best to make the cabin a home for my daughter. I'd placed a yellow sheet over the love seat not only to warm the looming white walls and gray floors, but to offer something bright and cheerful during a dark time. 


From Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother's Will to Survive by Stephanie Land ©2019. Published by Hachette Books.

Interviews with Stephanie Land

In her 20s, Stephanie Land left an abusive relationship with her infant daughter in tow. But leaving meant going it alone, and struggling to make money as a house cleaner to support her and her child. She tells Piya how the stigma attached to poverty and receiving social assistance prevented her from seeking financial help when she most needed it... and why she thinks we need to stop vilifying people in the situation she once found herself in. 12:11

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