Canadian

Liminal

Jordan Tannahill's Liminal ponders the meaning of consciousness.

Jordan Tannahill

At 11:04 a.m. on Jan. 21, 2017, Jordan opens the door to his mother's bedroom. As his eyes adjust to the half-light, he finds her lying in bed, eyes closed and mouth agape. In that instant he cannot tell whether she is asleep or dead. The sight of his mother's body, caught between these two possibilities, causes Jordan to plunge headlong into the uncertain depths of consciousness itself.

From androids to cannibals to sex clubs, an unforgettable personal odyssey emerges, populated by a cast of sublime outsiders in search for the ever-elusive nature of self. Part ontological thriller, part millennial saga, Liminal is a riotous and moving portrait of a young man in volatile times, a generation caught in suspended animation, and a son's enduring love for his mother. (From House of Anansi Press

From the book

I am wary of revelations. I find anyone claiming to have them dubious. They're usually charlatans, the ultra-religious, or insane (not that these three types are mutually exclusive; in fact they rarely are). And I find any description of these revelations some combination of sinister and comical, like John Smith receiving golden plates from the angel Moroni in a secret language only he can translate. Even the words "revelation" and "epiphany" are mired in Christian connotations. The first conjures images of John on the island of Patmos having visions of the Whore of Babylon and the Beast, while the second is the realization by the wise men that Christ is the Son of God, rendered throughout art history as the Adoration of the Magi.


From Liminal by Jordan Tannahill ©2018. Published by House of Anansi Press.

Interviews

The award-winning playwright on his first novel, which he calls “an extended meditation on the body.” 3:18