Books·Canadian

Lady Oracle

Margaret Atwood's third novel was released in 1976.

Margaret Atwood

An original and compelling work in which Margaret Atwood passes one woman's bizarre life through the prism of her unique literary vision. 

The shy, awkward wife of a perpetual radical, Joan Foster is a formerly obese woman whose delicate equilibrium is threatened by the fact that the several lives she has lived separately and secretly are coming together and will be exposed. She is newly and notoriously famous as a bestselling author; she writes gothic novels under a nom de plume; she is having a hidden affair. 

Love, fear, understanding, suspense, sensuality and humour — there is hardly an emotional current that is not touched in Lady Oracle, and with a depth, vitality and wit that are rare in any time. (From Emblem Editions)

From the book

I planned my death carefully; unlike my life, which meandered along from one thing to another, despite my feeble attempts to control it. My life had a tendency to spread, to get flabby, to scroll and festoon like the frame of a baroque mirror, which came from following the line of least resistance. I wanted my death, by contrast, to be neat and simple, understated, even a little severe, like a Quaker church or the basic black dress with a single strand of pearls much praised by fashion magazines when I was fifteen. No trumpets, no megaphones, no spangles, no loose ends, this time. The trick was to disappear without a trace, leaving behind me the shadow of a corpse, a shadow everyone would mistake for solid reality. At first I thought I'd managed it.


From Lady Oracle by Margaret Atwood ©1976. Published by McClelland & Stewart.

 

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