Books

Ivan Coyote, Trevor Herriot and Manjushree Thapa to judge 2019 Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize

The $60,000 award recognizes the best in Canadian literary nonfiction. The 2019 shortlist will be announced on Sept. 17, 2019.
Ivan Coyote (left), Trevor Herriot (centre) and Manjushree Thapa (right) will judge the 2019 Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction (Submitted by the Writers' Trust of Canada)

Ivan Coyote, Trevor Herriot and Manjushree Thapa will jury the 2019 Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction, one of the country's biggest nonfiction prizes.

The $60,000 award recognizes the best in Canadian literary nonfiction.

Ivan Coyote is a writer of fiction and nonfiction, a filmmaker and performer currently based in Vancouver. Their books include the memoir Tomboy Survival Guide, which was a finalist for the Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize in 2017, the collaborative book Gender Failure, the young adult story collection One in Every Crowd and the novel Bow Grip. They have also created four short films and three albums that combine music and storytelling. 

Trevor Herriot is a naturalist, activist and writer based in Regina. His books include Grass, Sky, Song: Promise and Peril in the World of Grassland Birds, which was shortlisted for the Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction and the Governor General's Literary Award for nonfiction in 2009. Herriot has also contributed to CBC Radio's Ideas, the Globe and Mail and National Geographic. He is also a regular guest on the CBC Radio show Blue Sky in Saskatchewan. 

Manjushree Thapa is a writer and translator based in Toronto. Her books include the novels Seasons of Flight  and All Of Us in Our Own Lives and the nonfiction works Forget Kathmandu and The Lives We Have Lost. Her essays have been published in the New York Times and the Globe and Mail and she has lectured at the University of Toronto and the National Gallery of Canada.

The 2019 shortlist will be announced on Sept. 17.

The winner will be announced at the Writers' Trust Awards ceremony in Toronto on Nov. 5.

Elizabeth Hay won the prize in 2018 for her memoir All Things Consoled.

Past winners include Rosemary Sullivan, Naomi Klein and Charles Foran.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.