Books·Canadian

Forever Terry: A Legacy in Letters

Forever Terry is a book edited by Darrell Fox.

edited by Darrell Fox

To mark the 40th anniversary of the Marathon of Hope, Forever Terry: A Legacy in Letters recounts the inspiration, dedication, and perseverance that Terry Fox embodied, and gives voice to an icon whose example spoke much louder than his words. Comprising 40 letters from 40 contributors, and edited by Terry's younger brother Darrell on behalf of the Fox family, Forever Terry pays tribute to Terry's legacy, as seen through the eyes of celebrated Canadians ranging from Margaret Atwood, Bobby Orr, Perdita Felicien, Jann Arden and Christine Sinclair, to those who accompanied Terry on his run, Terry Fox Run organizers, participants, supporters and cancer champions. Appearing alongside never-before-seen photos of their hero, their reflections reveal connections that readers would never have expected, and offer a glimpse into the way goodness and greatness inspire more of the same.

Forever Terry is a testament to the influence one brave man has had on the shape of Canadian dreams, ambitions, and commitment to helping others. Author proceeds support the Terry Fox Foundation, which has raised over $800 million for cancer research.

Contributors include Hayley Wickenheiser, Tom Cochrane, Darryl Sittler, Shawn Ashmore, Doug Alward, Nadine Caron, Douglas Coupland, Rick Hansen, Sidney Crosby, Akshay Grover, Lloyd Robertson, Bret Hart, Leslie Scrivener, Isadore Sharp, Wayne Gretzky, Jim Pattison, Catriona Le May Doan, Malindi Elmore, Michael Bublé, Silken Laumann, Steve Nash, Karl Subban and Marissa Papaconstantinou, among many others. (From Viking)

From the book

We tend to overuse the word "hero" these days, especially as it relates to sports figures. But the fact that we still honour the memory of this great Canadian four decades later is a testament to the fact that he is someone truly worthy of the title "hero."

Whenever I reflect on Terry's accomplishments and consider what he achieved despite his disability, it truly amazes me. He would run—or walk or hop or limp, whatever he needed to do—the equivalent of a marathon each and every day during his time on the highways of Canada. Just consider that for a moment: a marathon a day for a young man with one leg who was fighting cancer at the same time. I once read that it took him about twenty minutes of running each of those 143 days before he was able to accept the pain that came along with the activity, and then he would simply bare down and run yet another marathon. Yes, hero is the right word for Terry Fox.


Excerpted from Forever Terry: A Legacy in Letters edited by Darrell Fox. Copyright © 2020. Published by Viking, an imprint of Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited.

Interviews with Darrell Fox

It's the 40th anniversary of Terry Fox's Marathon of Hope. His brother Darrell Fox is releasing a new book called Forever Terry: A Legacy in Letters.

More about Terry Fox

1981: Terry Fox dies

41 years ago
Duration 2:24
One month before his 23rd birthday, Terry Fox passes away in a B.C. hospital..

In memory of Terry Fox

41 years ago
Duration 1:35
Thousands of Canadians take to the streets as part of the first annual Terry Fox Run. Leading the charge is Terry's close friend Rick Hansen.

The Marathon of Hope lives on

41 years ago
Duration 6:06
By 1981 people everywhere are running for Terry Fox and celebrating his achievement.

First annual Terry Fox Run in 1981

41 years ago
Duration 6:08
By 1981 people everywhere are running for Terry Fox and celebrating his achievement.

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