Books

Drew Hayden Taylor & Clayton Gauthier win 2020 PMC Indigenous Literature Awards

The $3,000 awards represent the best of Indigenous literature, as well as encourage family literacy, intergenerational storytelling and information sharing.
Drew Hayden Taylor (left) and Clayton Gauthier are the winners of the  2020 PMC Indigenous Literature Awards. (CBC, Submitted by First Nation Communities READ)

Drew Hayden Taylor and Clayton Gauthier are the winners of the  2020 PMC Indigenous Literature Awards.

The awards are worth $3,000 each and are chosen by a jury of Indigenous librarians from across Ontario.

They represent the best of Indigenous literature, as well as encourage family literacy, intergenerational storytelling and information sharing.

Taylor won the young adult/adult category for his novel Chasing Painted Horses.

Chasing Painted Horses follows four young friends from a reserve called Otter Lake, located north of Toronto. One day, Ralph and Shelley's mother installs a large chalkboard at home and challenges the four friends to a weekly art contest. The quietest of them, Danielle, draws a stunning horse and wins, an inconspicuous event that will reverberate throughout their lives.

Taylor is an Ojibway playwright, author and journalist from Curve Lake First Nations in Ontario. He as written several books, including the YA novel The Night Wanderer, the novel Motorcycle and Sweetgrass andTake Us to Your Chief, a collection of Indigenous science fiction short stories.

Gauthier won the children's book category for The Bear's Medicine.

The Bear's Medicine is a picture book about how a mother bear feeds her cub, and how she teaches him to care for and respect the land that feeds them.

Gauthier is a visual artist and author from Cree/Dakelh from British Columbia. He is also the author of the picture book The Salmon Run.

First Nations Communities Read is an annual reading program launched in 2003 by the First Nations public library community in Ontario. 

The titles selected for the program are written and/or illustrated by a First Nation, Metis or Inuit creator and contain Indigenous content.

Last year's winners were Monique Gray Smith for the novel Tilly and the Crazy Eights and Cindy Blackstock for the picture book Spirit Bear: Fishing for Knowledge, Catching Dreams.

Other past winners include Seven Fallen Feathers by Tanya Talaga, The Water Walker by Joanne Robertson and Bearskin Diary by Carol Rose GoldenEagle.

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