Books

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

The story that spawned the Blade Runner films.

Philip K. Dick

By 2021, the World War has killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remain covet any living creature, and for people who can't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacra: horses, birds, cats, sheep. They've even built humans. Immigrants to Mars receive androids so sophisticated they are indistinguishable from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans can wreak, the government bans them from Earth. Driven into hiding, unauthorized androids live among human beings, undetected. Rick Deckard, an officially sanctioned bounty hunter, is commissioned to find rogue androids and "retire" them. But when cornered, androids fight back — with lethal force. (From Del Rey)

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From the book 

A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard. ­Surprised—it always surprised him to find himself awake without prior notice—­he rose from the bed, stood up in his multicolored pajamas, and stretched. Now, in her bed, his wife Iran opened her gray, unmerry eyes, blinked, then groaned and shut her eyes again.

"You set your Penfield too weak," he said to her. "I'll reset it and you'll be awake and—­"

"Keep your hand off my settings." Her voice held bitter sharpness. "I don't want to be awake."

He seated himself beside her, bent over her, and explained softly. "If you set the surge up high enough, you'll be glad you're awake; that's the whole point. At setting C it overcomes the threshold barring consciousness, as it does for me." Friendlily, because he felt well-­disposed toward the world—­his setting had been at D—­he patted her bare, pale shoulder.

"Get your crude cop's hand away," Iran said.

"I'm not a cop." He felt irritable, now, although he hadn't dialed for it.

"You're worse," his wife said, her eyes still shut. "You're a murderer hired by the cops."

"I've never killed a human being in my life." His irritability had risen now; had become outright hostility.

Iran said, "Just those poor andys."


From Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick ©1996. Published by Del Rey.

More about the book

David Huebert, the author of the story collection Peninsula Sinking, on what makes Philip K. Dick's 1968 novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" worth rereading. 1:42

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