Books

Daniel J. Levitin wins $30K National Business Book Award

Levitin won for A Field Guide to Lies, which explores truth, lies and navigating the increasingly bumpy terrain of twisted facts and fake news in media today.
Daniel J. Levitin is a neuroscientist, musician and author. (Allen Lane/Peter Prato for The Canadian Press)

Daniel J. Levitin has won the National Business Book Award for A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age.

A Field Guide to Lies explores truth, lies and navigating the increasingly bumpy terrain of twisted facts and fake news in media today.

The $30,000 prize is given to the best Canadian business book of the year. The selection is based on originality, relevance, excellence of writing, thoroughness of research and depth of analysis.

The other finalists were Charles Bronfman with Howard Green for Distilled, Don Tapscott and Alex Tapscott for Blockchain Revolution and Annette Verschuren with Eleanor Beaton for Bet On Me.

The winner was chosen by a jury consisted of Deirdre McMurdy, David Denison, Anna Porter and Pamela Wallin, and was chaired by the CBC's Peter Mansbridge.

Levitin's previous books include This Is Your Brain on Music, The Organized Mind and The World in Six Songs. He currently teaches at McGill University. 

The National Business Book Award has been given out annually since 1986. Past winners include Chrystia Freeland for Plutocrats, Naomi Klein for No Logo and Ezra Levant for Ethical Oil.

For neuroscientist Daniel Levitin our tendency to believe the things we see in the media is problematic because it values immediacy over accuracy. By observing breaking news coverage and the consumption of it Levitin was confronted with how vital exercising critical thinking is. So he wrote a book about it - A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age. He joins guest host Candy Palmater to give her the tips and tricks to staying informed while also staying critical. 18:36

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