Books

Canadian author and historian Charlotte Gray to sit on five-person Cundill History Prize jury

Administered by McGill University, the $75,000 US Cundill History Prize recognizes the best nonfiction history book in English.
Charlotte Gray is the author of The Promise of Canada: 150 Years — People and Ideas That Have Shaped Our Country. (Valberg Imaging)

Canadian author and historian Charlotte Gray will sit on the five-person jury for the 2019 Cundill History Prize, it was announced at the London Book Fair on Tuesday.

Administered by McGill University, the Cundill History Prize recognizes the best nonfiction history book in English. It is open internationally and offers a $75,000 US ($100,289 Cdn) purse for the winning author.

The British-born and Ottawa-based Gray has written nearly a dozen books on Canadian history. She's covered everything from the Massey Murder to the Klondike Gold Rush.

Her most recent book, The Promise of Canada, weaves together nine portraits of Canadians who have influenced the course of the country.

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Alan Taylor will chair the five-person jury.

The other members include German-born historian Robert Gerwarth, U.S.-based academic Jane Kamensky and British-based professor Rana Mitter.

Harvard professor Maya Jasanoff won the 2018 Cundill History Prize for biography The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World.

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